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This graphic shows the path of Tuesday's solar eclipse and how much you can see from different places. The yellow band represents the path of totality, or the areas in which a total eclipse will be visible. Other areas will be able to see a partial solar eclipse. Michael Zeiler, greatamericaneclipse.com hide caption

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Michael Zeiler, greatamericaneclipse.com

Visitors look at a model of a Saturn V rocket and its launch umbilical tower, which were used during the Apollo moon-landing program, at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Fifty years ago this July 20, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the moon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine (from left), Sen. Ted Cruz, D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson and Margot Lee Shetterly, author of the book Hidden Figures, unveil the Hidden Figures Way street sign at a dedication ceremony on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. NASA/Joel Kowsky hide caption

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NASA/Joel Kowsky

Street Outside NASA Headquarters Renamed: Hidden Figures Way

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Astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. walks near the lunar module during the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

'One Giant Leap' Explores The Herculean Effort Behind The 1969 Moon Landing

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Support structure for the thermal probe called "the mole." NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA Engineers Try To Remedy Stuck Probe On Mars

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A Falcon 9 rocket carried 60 satellites for SpaceX's Starlink broadband network into space last month. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Astronomers Worry That Elon Musk's New Satellites Will Ruin The View

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Amateur Astronomers Gather For 'Star Parties'

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An imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe produced all the things in existence, including corned beef sandwiches. Erik Rank/Getty Images hide caption

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Erik Rank/Getty Images

Why Corned Beef Sandwiches — And The Rest Of The Universe — Exist

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Phil Plait Phil Plait hide caption

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Phil Plait

Phil Plait: How Can Mistakes Lead To Scientific Advancement?

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Boarding Pass for Mars nasa.gov hide caption

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nasa.gov

NASA Wants To Send Your Name To Mars In 2020

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Asteroid Simulation Reveals How Well Earth's Planetary Defenses Work

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