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Huge crowds turn up each week to watch a game of baseball on a woodchip field, where the players wear snowshoes. Mackenzie Martin/WXPR hide caption

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Mackenzie Martin/WXPR

Crowds Gather Each Week In Wisconsin To Watch Their Teams Play Ball — In Snowshoes

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"Sometimes I just want to hide in my island home back in Hawaii and keep things simple," says surfer Bethany Hamilton. But she believes her story can be an example of "inspiration and hope" for young people. Aaron Lieber/Entertainment Studios hide caption

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Aaron Lieber/Entertainment Studios

For Bethany Hamilton, Surfing Is 'An Escape From All The Chaos On Land'

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Albert Almora Jr. of the Chicago Cubs is comforted by Jason Heyward after a young child was injured by a foul ball off Almora's bat. The accident happened on May 29 in the fourth inning of a game against the Houston Astros at Minute Maid Park in Houston. Bob Levey/Getty Images hide caption

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Bob Levey/Getty Images

After Numerous Foul Ball Fan Injuries, Baseball Reconsiders Protective Netting

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From left, U.S. Soccer Federation President Carlos Cordeiro, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and soccer players Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan and Ashlyn Harris celebrate the U.S. women's soccer team's world championship in New York, during a ticker tape parade along the Canyon of Heroes Wednesday. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig speaks during a Hall of Fame induction ceremony at the Clark Sports Center on July 30, 2017, in Cooperstown, N.Y. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

U.S. Women's National Team players celebrate with the FIFA Women's World Cup Trophy following team's victory Sunday. Maja Hitij/Getty Images hide caption

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Maja Hitij/Getty Images

Equal Pay For Equal Play; The U.S. Women's Soccer Team Tackles Its Next Quest

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Megan Rapinoe and the U.S. squad won a lot of fans on their way to winning the Women's World Cup on Sunday in Lyon, France. For the sport to keep growing, that support needs to continue long after the ticker tape lands. Alex Grimm/Getty Images hide caption

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The United States' Megan Rapinoe celebrates after scoring the opening goal from the penalty spot during the Women's World Cup final soccer match between the U.S. and the Netherlands at the Stade de Lyon in Décines, outside Lyon, France, on Sunday. The U.S. won 2-0. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

The Netherlands are the last team standing between the United States and its fourth Women's World Cup. Here, U.S. forward Megan Rapinoe watches her teammates warm up before Tuesday's 2-1 semifinal win over England. Alex Grimm/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig sits outside his luxury suite to watch the Milwaukee Brewers game at Miller Park. His new book reveals how he navigated tumultuous events in his career like the devastating player strike and the spread of performance-enhancing drugs. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

Candid And Sometimes Angry, Bud Selig's New Book May Surprise You

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U.S. forward Megan Rapinoe celebrates after scoring her team's second goal during Friday's quarterfinal match against France. The Americans now face an England squad that brings confidence and defensive power. Richard Heathcote/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Heathcote/Getty Images