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USA defender Walker Zimmerman (#3) fights for the ball with Netherlands' forward Memphis Depay during the 2022 World Cup round of 16 match at Khalifa International Stadium in Al Rayyan, Qatar, on Saturday. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S.'s 2022 World Cup run is over after falling to the Netherlands, 3-1

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USA men's soccer team coach Gregg Berhalter speaks during a news conference at the Qatar National Convention Center in Doha on Dec. 2, 2022. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Japan played like they can beat anyone (and they did, topping both Spain and Germany). Brazil is still the favorite to win it all, even as they wait to see if their star striker Neymar can return from injury. And the U.S., led by team captain Tyler Adams, has looked better than expected. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images; Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images; Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images; Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images; Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images

Anish Adhikari, now 26, worked construction jobs in Qatar for 33 months in the lead-up to the World Cup. In this 2021 photo, he poses inside the new Lusail stadium, which he helped build and which will host the World Cup final on Dec. 18. Adhikari says the Nepali agent who got him the job misled him about working conditions in Qatar: "They sell a dream that's not reality." Anish Adhikari hide caption

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Anish Adhikari

Death and dishonesty: Stories of two workers who built the World Cup stadiums in Qatar

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Members of security, right, speak with two Iran supporters as they take away a flag reading "Woman life freedom" prior to the match between Wales and Iran on Nov. 25. Giuseppe Cacace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Giuseppe Cacace/AFP via Getty Images

Julia Ruth poses in the Cyr wheel. Rob Riingen/Julia Ruth hide caption

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Rob Riingen/Julia Ruth

Arts Week: Physics Meets The Circus

Julia Ruth's job takes a lot of strength, a lot of balance, and a surprising amount of physics. She's a circus artist — and has performed her acrobatic Cyr wheel routine around the world. But before she learned her trade and entered the limelight, she was on a very different career path — she was studying physics. Julia talks with Emily (who also shares a past life in the circus) about her journey from physicist to circus artist, and how she learned her physics-defining acts.

Arts Week: Physics Meets The Circus

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Seattle Mariners pitcher Gaylord Perry throws in his 300th Major League victory, a 7-3 win over the New York Yankees in Seattle, on May 6, 1982. The Hall of Famer and two-time Cy Young winner died Thursday. Barry Sweet/AP hide caption

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Barry Sweet/AP

Christian Pulisic of the United States attends a news conference before a training session at Al-Gharafa SC Stadium, in Doha, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

Argentina's Lionel Messi smiles during the World Cup group C soccer match between Poland and Argentina in Doha, Qatar, on Wednesday. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

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Ariel Schalit/AP

A woman at a protest in Qatar holds up a sign bearing the name of Mahsa Amini, the 22-year-old Iranian woman whose death in police custody sparked a nationwide protest movement. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

Gregg Berhalter, head coach of United States team, looks on during a training session on Monday in Doha, Qatar. The U.S. faces Iran in a crucial match on Tuesday. Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images

What's at stake as the U.S. faces Iran at the World Cup

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Wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. is shown walking on the sideline during a NFL divisional playoff football game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Jan. 23, 2022, in Tampa, Fla. Alex Menendez/AP hide caption

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Alex Menendez/AP

Two anti-riot police officers wave the Iranian flags during a street celebration after Iran defeated Wales in Qatar's World Cup, at Sadeghieh Sq. in Tehran, Iran, Friday, Nov. 25, 2022. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Argentina's Lionel Messi, center, celebrates at the end of the World Cup group C soccer match between Argentina and Mexico, at the Lusail Stadium in Lusail, Qatar, on Saturday. Argentina won 2-0. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP
Manan Vatsyayana / AFP via Getty Images

Tim Weah of the United States celebrates after scoring the team's goal during a World Cup match against Wales on November 21, 2022 in Doha, Qatar. Wales and the U-S finished 1-1. Ryan Pierse/Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

For Tim Weah, a World Cup goal capped a family journey. Now he's ready for England

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