Sports NPR sports news and interviews.

Carli Lloyd of the U.S. (in white) celebrates after scoring on a penalty kick Tuesday night in the Americans' 2-0 World Cup semifinal victory against Germany. Elsa/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Elsa/Getty Images

Adonal Foyle (center) plays for the Orlando Magic against the Milwaukee Bucks in 2007. Doug Benc/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Doug Benc/Getty Images

How To Win The Money Game: A Former NBA Star Shares Financial Advice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/416793011/418098787" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This year's ESPN NCAA basketball coverage did not shy away from talking about the ordinarily sensitive topic of betting as much as it has in the past. Streeter Lecka/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

ESPN Brings Betting Talk To The Mainstream

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/417101885/417840429" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Goalie Hope Solo of the United States celebrates with midfielder Carli Lloyd on Friday after defeating China 1-0 in the Women's World Cup quarterfinals in Ottawa, Canada. Jana Chytilova/Freestyle Photo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jana Chytilova/Freestyle Photo/Getty Images

Colombia's Nairo Quintana, wearing the best young rider's white jersey,crosses the finish line of the 19th stage of the 2015 Tour de France on Friday. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Dejong/AP

The Cycling World May Soon Bow Down Before Nairo Quintana

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/417115274/417516527" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Teenaged Female Shortstop Could Be Signed by MLB Team

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/417045147/417045148" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marcel Granollers (left) and Roger Federer leave the court at the U.S. Open in Flushing, N.Y., last August. Commentator Frank Deford says with all that baggage, tennis needs caddies. Leslie Billman/Ai Wire/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Leslie Billman/Ai Wire/Landov

The Quieter Sports Season, And Why Tennis Needs Caddies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/416822378/417045209" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ESPN Report Finds Pete Rose Bet On Baseball As A Player

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/416910356/416910357" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript