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Helen Grace James holds images from her time in the Air Force. "The military was something I thought was really important," she told The Washington Post. Legal Aid at Work hide caption

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Legal Aid at Work

Kicked Out Of Air Force For Being Gay, Helen Grace James Wins Honorable Discharge

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During the 2013 shutdown, tourists have to look at Mount Rushmore from the highway because the national memorial in Keystone, S.D., was closed. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Open Or Closed? Here's What Happens In A Partial Government Shutdown

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The Department of Health and Humans Services is adding a Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in some kinds of care because of moral or religious objections. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

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Americans generally have little confidence in the institutions that control the U.S. Brittany Mayes/NPR hide caption

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Brittany Mayes/NPR

Here's Just How Little Confidence Americans Have In Political Institutions

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Lyons-Boswick goes to Veterans Courthouse in Newark to have a judge sign off on a warrant she needs to prosecute a sexual assault case. Cassandra Giraldo for NPR hide caption

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Cassandra Giraldo for NPR

How Prosecutors Changed The Odds To Start Winning Some Of The Toughest Rape Cases

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As U.S. Accepts DACA Renewal Applications, Trump Says Program Is 'Probably Dead'

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Trump's Latest Vulgar Comments Cast Shadow Over Legislative Agenda

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In a federal indictment, Phillip Durachinsky faces numerous charges including installing malware on thousands of computers and the production of child pornography. Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department hide caption

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Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department

Ohio Man Charged With Putting Spyware On Thousands of Computers

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Flu patient Donnie Cardenas waits in an emergency room hallway with roommate Torrey Jewett at the Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, Calif., this past week. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Flu Season Is Shaping Up To Be A Nasty One, CDC Says

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Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, led efforts to require work for Medicaid recipients while in charge of Indiana's program. She was sworn in as administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services by Vice President Pence on March 14. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Will Let States Require People To Work For Medicaid

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Patricia (from left), Natalie and their mother, Rosemary, sit in their home in Northern California. Natalie, a woman with an intellectual disability, is unable to speak. She couldn't explain what was wrong and doctors couldn't figure out why she was in pain. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

'She Can't Tell Us What's Wrong'

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LA Johnson/NPR

Congress Changed 529 College Savings Plans, And Now States Are Nervous

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Pauline stands in her room after coming home from a day program for adults with intellectual disabilities. Michelle Gustafson for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Gustafson for NPR

The Sexual Assault Epidemic No One Talks About

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Publication of Michael Wolff's new book about the Trump White House was moved up, despite the president's threat to block it. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

'People Regret What They Said To Me,' Michael Wolff Tells NPR About Trump Book

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Ollie and Daniel Williams stand in front of their raised home with their children Trinity, 9, and Masen, 12. The land surrounding their house floods so often that the family keeps a small fiberglass canoe tied to the bottom of the front steps and a flat-bottom boat tied to the side of their house to aid in evacuating. William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

Louisiana Says Thousands Should Move From Vulnerable Coast, But Can't Pay Them

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Here's what archaeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption

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Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

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Dr. Ronald Cirillo helps Deborah Hatfield fill out paperwork at a Florida clinic, before running a test to see whether she has hepatitis C. Daylina Miller/Health News Florida hide caption

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Daylina Miller/Health News Florida

From Retirement To The Front Lines Of Hepatitis C Treatment

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Suleiman Ibrahim Osman, from Syria, sits outside his tent in the Kawergosk refugee camp in northern Iraq in April. He's one of millions of people worldwide who have recently been forced out of their homes from war. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

The Year The U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program Unraveled

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New York Police Department officers prepare for New Year's Eve celebrations in Manhattan's Times Square in New York. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Tightest Security In Years At New Year's Celebrations In New York And Las Vegas

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New York City has seen a precipitous drop in crime over the past several years. Bill Bratton, who served as NYPD's commissioner, says the department's police tactics have contributed to that crime reduction. Scott Roth/Invision/AP hide caption

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Scott Roth/Invision/AP

How Crime Rates In New York City Reached Record Lows

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Deborah and Joe Thompson were married for six years. He died from an accidental heroin overdose in 2016. Todd Hugen Photography hide caption

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Todd Hugen Photography

Opioid Policy Becomes Personal For One Health Official After Husband's Death

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President Trump speaks about the Republican tax bill after signing it into law in the Oval Office on Dec. 22. Trump has signed 96 laws this year. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Signed 96 Laws In 2017. Here Is What They Do And How They Measure Up

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