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Story of the Day

The Aurora ICE Processing Center in Colorado currently holds more than 600 immigrant detainees on behalf of the federal government. The facility is operated by GEO Group, a for-profit government contractor. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

ICE releases investigation into immigrant's death after months of 'inexcusable' delay

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Palestinians look for survivors of an Israeli bombardment in the Maghazi refugee camp in the Gaza Strip on Sunday. Hatem Moussa/AP hide caption

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Hatem Moussa/AP

Israel says Hamas won't rule Gaza. So who will?

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The Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday that test the ability of public officials to block critics from their personal social media pages. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Can public officials block you on social media? It's up to the Supreme Court

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President Biden makes a rare appearance in the press cabin on Air Force One during his return from Tel Aviv to talk about a deal to get aid into Gaza through Egypt. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Biden says his Tel Aviv trip was a gamble. Tonight, he has another high-stakes moment

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President Biden walks toward Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on Fri., Oct. 13, 2023. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Biden made promises to Israel and Ukraine. To keep his word, he needs Congress

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AI similar to the kind used to make images is now being used to design synthetic proteins. Scientists say its radically sped up their research. Ian C Haydon/UW Institute for Protein Design hide caption

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Ian C Haydon/UW Institute for Protein Design

New proteins, better batteries: Scientists are using AI to speed up discoveries

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Billboards supporting women seeking abortions are popping up along I-55 heading north

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Conservation professionals learn how to respond to cultural heritage emergencies following disasters at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston on Sept. 20. Chloe Veltman/NPR hide caption

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Chloe Veltman/NPR

Have an heirloom ruined by climate disaster? There's a hotline to call for help

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President Biden's chief of staff Jeff Zients, seen here in the Oval Office on May 16, 2023, is working with federal agencies to brace for a government shutdown this weekend. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The White House chief of staff says it's on House Republicans to avert a shutdown

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy didn't mince words when he talked about the threat of Russia's war. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

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Kholood Eid for NPR

As the U.S. mulls more aid to Ukraine, Zelenskyy says 'we have the same values'

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The Consumer Product Safety Commission's new album features some of its iconic mascots on the cover and seven safety-focused tracks. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

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U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

A federal agency wants to give safety tips to young adults. So it's dropping an album

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In this aerial picture taken on Aug. 21, a vehicle drives through floodwaters following heavy rains from Tropical Storm Hilary in Thousand Palms, Calif. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

California's lawsuit says oil giants downplayed climate change. Here's what to know

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Ukrainian refugees enter the El Chaparral border crossing between Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego in April 2022. The foreign-born share of the U.S. population, which had been roughly flat since 2017, rose to nearly 14% last year. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

The immigrant population in the U.S. is climbing again, setting a record last year

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Monterrious Harris, inside his East Memphis, Tenn., home, says he was beaten by the same police unit days before Tyre Nichols was killed in January 2023. "It was like three or four guys. They were all wearing black masks. I remember two of them had big assault rifles." Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Memphis Police pressured to change culture after high-profile killings and beatings

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A barrier to deter migrants from crossing from Mexico into the U.S. floats in the Rio Grande at Eagle Pass, Texas. Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images

The floating border barrier in the Rio Grande must be removed, a federal judge rules

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People hold signs as members of SAG-AFTRA and Writers Guild of America East walk a picket line outside of the HBO/Amazon offices during the National Union Solidarity Day in New York City on Aug. 22, 2023. Labor unions have notched some big victories this year but organized labor still faces an uncertain future. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

4 things to know on Labor Day — from the Hot Labor Summer to the Hollywood strikes

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Ruby Franke, pictured here on her Instagram account, was arrested on suspicion of aggravated child abuse. @Moms_of_Truth/Instagram hide caption

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@Moms_of_Truth/Instagram

Who is Ruby Franke? What to know about the mommy vlogger accused of child abuse

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Protesters hold up signs outside of the Denver Public Schools administration building to demand equity for students attending classes in excessively hot classrooms. Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images

As classes resume in sweltering heat, many schools lack air conditioning

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Former President Donald Trump's booking photo was released after he was booked in Atlanta. Fulton County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Fulton County Sheriff's Office

Donald Trump has been booked at the Atlanta jail on Georgia election charges

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Residents of Brooklyn's Flatbush neighborhood register to vote at a voter registration event on Sept. 29, 2021. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Some states are trying to boost youth voter registration. Here's what they're doing

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Yu & Me Books was a fairly new business when a fire — which broke out above the store on July 4 — caused substantial damage to the shop. Now, owner Lucy Yu is working to rebuild not just the physical bookstore, but the community around it as well. Caroline Xia/Yu & Me Books hide caption

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Caroline Xia/Yu & Me Books

Fire devastated this NYC Chinatown bookshop — community has rushed to its aid

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A bullet casing is seen at the site of a mass shooting in the Brooklyn Homes neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland, on Sunday. Two people were killed and 28 others were wounded during the shooting at a block party on Saturday night. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Getty Images

July has already seen 11 mass shootings. The emotional scars won't heal easily

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