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When he was younger, climate change felt like an abstract concept to Gabriel Nagel. Then a wildfire burned near his home. Eli Imadali hide caption

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Eli Imadali

Coping with climate change: Advice for kids — from kids

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Are the justices of the U.S Supreme Court ready to overturn the power of state courts to oversee congressional elections in the states? Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Supreme Court to hear controversial election-law case

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Technicians from DTEK, Ukraine's largest private energy company, work to replace a cable at a substation in the Teremky neighborhood of Kyiv on Wednesday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

In an ongoing race, Ukraine tries to repair faster than Russia bombs

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Signs like this one, spotted Oct. 26, 2022, are all over northern Gaston County, N.C., near where Piedmont Lithium wants to build a 1,500-acre lithium mining and processing operation. David Boraks/WFAE hide caption

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David Boraks/WFAE

A proposed lithium mine presents a climate versus environment conflict

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Kevin Soyt, Robert Hamilton and Dave Bayer participate in a water aerobics class in the John Knox Village Continuing Care Retirement Community pool on Oct. 15, 2021 in Pompano Beach, Fla. The Social Security Administration announced the largest cost-of-living adjustment in decades: 8.7%. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

High inflation leads to the biggest raise in Social Security in more than 40 years

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The new bivalent COVID-19 booster is offered by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. Health experts say getting more people boosted could help stave off a winter COVID surge. Sarah Reingewirtz/ MediaNews Group/ Los Angeles Daily News via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Reingewirtz/ MediaNews Group/ Los Angeles Daily News via Getty Images

Early signs a new U.S. COVID surge could be on its way

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President Biden participates in a meeting on Feb. 22. Biden's approval rating is up to 44%, which marks a third straight month of increases to Biden's approval rating. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

NPR poll shows Biden's approval rating is up but there are warning signs for Democrats

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Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States/Getty Images

The Supreme Court will begin a new term with more contentious cases on its docket

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Health officials are predicting this winter could see an active flu season on top of potential COVID surges. In short, it's a good year to be a respiratory virus. Left: Image of SARS-CoV-2 omicron virus particles (pink) replicating within an infected cell (teal). Right: Image of an inactive H3N2 influenza virus. NIAID/Science Source hide caption

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NIAID/Science Source

Flu is expected to flare up in U.S. this winter, raising fears of a 'twindemic'

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A BNSF freight train. Frank Morris hide caption

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Frank Morris

How a freight train strike could throw your plans to travel by train off track

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The FDA is expected to authorize a new COVID-19 booster shot this week. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

FDA expected to authorize new omicron-specific COVID boosters this week

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Jared Mauch, a network architect by day, wanted better internet at his home in rural Michigan. So he started his own internet service provider. Job Snijders hide caption

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Job Snijders

Fed up with poor broadband access, he started his own fiber internet service provider

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Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., appears at an Election Day gathering in Jackson, Wyo., to concede defeat in a GOP primary to Harriet Hageman, who was backed by former President Trump. Cheney vows that she will carry on her work to make sure Trump doesn't return to the presidency. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Liz Cheney is considering a presidential run to stop Trump after losing her House seat

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The FDA is trying to make "bivalent" COVID vaccines, which target two different antigens, available as soon as September. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Reformulated COVID vaccine boosters may be available earlier than expected

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Steve Bannon, who was chief strategist for former President Donald Trump, appears on a video screen above members of the House committee that's investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol, during a hearing on July 12. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Steve Bannon goes on trial for defying Jan. 6 panel subpoena

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A U.S. Secret Service agent stands by as Marine One departs with President Biden aboard as he departs the White House in September 2021. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Secret Service erased texts from two-day period spanning Jan. 6 attack, watchdog says

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A Covid-19 testing site stands on a Brooklyn street corner in April. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A new dominant omicron strain in the U.S. is driving up cases — and reinfections

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Shooting range owner John Deloca fires his pistol at his range in Queens, N.Y. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

Most gun owners favor modest restrictions but deeply distrust government, poll finds

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Abortion-rights advocates demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court last December as it heard a case that could strike down the constitutional right to abortion. Economists say decades of research show that doing so would limit women's economic prospects. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Women who are denied abortions risk falling deeper into poverty. So do their kids

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Lonny and Sandy Phillips attend a showing of the film "Under The Gun" at Victoria Theatre on April 27, 2016 in San Francisco, California. Steve Jennings/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Jennings/Getty Images

She lost her daughter in a mass shooting. Here's what she will tell parents in Uvalde

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This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virus particles, left, and spherical immature particles, right. Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regner/CDC via AP hide caption

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Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regner/CDC via AP

Monkeypox likely isn't much of a threat to the public, a White House official says

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The Flossmoor Health Center opened in 2018. A procedure room where abortions and other reproductive health care are performed. The standard medical equipment includes an ultra sound machine and various monitors. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Illinois is preparing for a potential influx of people seeking abortions

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