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Nearly two-dozen U.S. senators are calling on Kathleen Kraninger, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, to investigate a loan servicer called the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

23 Senators Demand Investigation Into Mismanagement Of Student Loan Program

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Wildfires In Northern California Force Nearly 200,000 People To Evacuate

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At Chicago's McCormick Place, neuroscientists from around the world presented their work to colleagues. But some researchers were denied entry because of the Trump administration's travel ban. Rob Piercy/Allen Institute hide caption

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Rob Piercy/Allen Institute

U.S. Travel Ban Disrupts The World's Largest Brain Science Meeting

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House Republicans Disrupt Closed-Door Session During Impeachment Inquiry Proceedings

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The Houston Astros' Roberto Osuna pitches against the New York Yankees during the American League Championship Series on Oct. 15. On Saturday night, the Astros' assistant general manager targeted a small cluster of female reporters with a profane defense of Osuna, who agreed to the equivalent of a restraining order after being accused in Canada of assaulting the mother of his child. Mike Stobe/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Stobe/Getty Images

Astros Executive's Rant At Reporters Draws Firestorm On Eve Of Series

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Scientists are exploring a new technique, called prime editing, that is more precise than CRISPR and which uses certain enzymes, including reverse transcriptase, to edit DNA. Evan Oto/Science Source hide caption

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Evan Oto/Science Source

Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes

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Peter Navarro, White House director of trade and manufacturing policy, has admitted quoting a fictional character in several of his nonfiction books. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

White House Adviser Peter Navarro Calls Fictional Alter Ego An 'Inside Joke'

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Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan holds a news conference in June. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan Is Out

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Associates of President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani have been arrested on campaign finance charges. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

2 Giuliani Associates Arrested On Campaign Finance Violations

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Berkshire, the camp director, and other mentors spend one-on-one time with campers. One child said they feel like this is their "real" home and the other home they live in full time is a "backup." Kavitha Cardoza for NPR hide caption

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Kavitha Cardoza for NPR

At This Camp, Children Of Opioid Addicts Learn To Cope And Laugh

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The crumpled carcass of a bull lies on U.S. Forest Service ground. It was among several killed and mutilated this summer in eastern Oregon. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

'Not One Drop Of Blood': Cattle Mysteriously Mutilated In Oregon

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After the allegations of sexual harassment surfaced, chef Charlie Hallowell issued an apology, saying he was "deeply ashamed and so very sorry." Jessica Chou for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Chou for NPR

This Chef Says He's Faced His #MeToo Offenses. Now He Wants A Second Chance

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A worker assembles an industrial valve at Emerson Electric Co.'s factory in Marshalltown, Iowa. The manufacturing sector has seen a slowdown amid the ongoing trade war. Tim Aeppel/Reuters hide caption

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Tim Aeppel/Reuters

Hiring Steady As Employers Add 136,000 Jobs; Unemployment Dips To 3.5%

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Karen Bradley worked at St. Clare's Hospital in Schenectady, N.Y., for 24 years. Along with hundreds of others who worked at the Catholic hospital, she has learned that the pension she was counting on for retirement is gone. Craig Miller for NPR hide caption

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Craig Miller for NPR

'Why Is There Nothing Left?' Pension Funds Failing At Catholic Hospitals

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A worker cuts black granite to make a countertop. Though granite, marble and "engineered stone" all can produce harmful silica dust when cut, ground or polished, the artificial stone typically contains much more silica, says a CDC researcher tracking cases of silicosis. danishkhan/Getty Images hide caption

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danishkhan/Getty Images

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops

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