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A Tea Party supporter, left, argues with a critic before a rally where former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin spoke at the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison on April 16. Darren Hauck/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Hauck/Getty Images

The Linwood neighborhood in Tuscaloosa, Ala., was pulverized by the nation's deadliest tornado outbreak in nearly four decades. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Scattered Across Ala. City: Broken Homes, Memories

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Judges Question Evidence On Guantanamo Detainees

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President Obama speaks Wednesday to reporters about the controversy over his birth certificate. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Obama Chides Media For Role In 'Birther' Controversy

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Grover Norquist (left), of the anti-tax lobbying group Americans for Tax Reform, and Sen. Tom Coburn (R-OK, right) have been in an unusually public spat. Coburn, who seven years ago signed Norquist's so-called Taxpayer Protection Pledge, now says a solution to the deficit could involve an increase in tax revenues. Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images (Norquist photo); Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images (Coburn photo) hide caption

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Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images (Norquist photo); Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images (Coburn photo)

A U.S. military guard carries shackles in preparation for moving a detainee at the U.S. detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Detainees Transferred Or Freed Despite 'High Risk'

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Banned from college football, Robert Quinn is likely to be a top NFL draft pick. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

Neither Ban Nor Tumor Can Stop Top NFL Prospect

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Gas prices in April in Washington, D.C. reach $5 a gallon. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

The sauce bar at Haidilao Hot Pot restaurant in Beijing. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

A gas station with fuel prices in the $4 range in Los Angeles on April 11. With the price of gas above $3.50 a gallon in all but one state, there are signs that Americans are cutting back on driving, reversing a steady increase in demand for fuel as the economy improves. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP

$4 A Gallon Gas Prices: Who's To Blame?

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Christian landlord Ayman Dimitry, shown with his 5-year-old daughter, Juliena, says his ear was cut off by men who accused him of renting an apartment to Muslim prostitutes. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Steve Marion, who calls his band Delicate Steve, at work. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Everything You Know About This Band Is Wrong

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An air traffic controller drinks a cup of coffee while working in a terminal radar approach control room Monday at the Atlanta TRACON in Peachtree City, Ga. Several recent reports of controllers nodding off on the job prompted new scheduling rules. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

The King James Bible, published in 1611, celebrates its 400th birthday this year. Above, a 1754 illustration depicts a group of robed translators presenting a bible to King James I. The king commissioned the new translation in 1604, and for the next seven years, 47 scholars and theologians worked through the Bible line by line. Illustration by George E. Kruger/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Illustration by George E. Kruger/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Hallelujah! At Age 400, King James Bible Still Reigns

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