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As Trump And Congress Flip-Flop On Health Care, Insurers Try To Plan Ahead

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A demonstrator protests the verdict in the trial of four Los Angeles police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney King outside the Los Angeles Police Department headquarters on April 29, 1992. Riots broke out in Los Angeles after a jury acquitted the four police officers accused of beating King. Mike Nelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Nelson/AFP/Getty Images

'It's Not Your Grandfather's LAPD' — And That's A Good Thing

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An illustration of a fetal lamb inside the "artificial womb" device, which mimics the conditions inside a pregnant animal. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia hide caption

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The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Scientists Create Artificial Womb That Could Help Prematurely Born Babies

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A pilot prepares to launch an unmanned aerial vehicle from a ground control station earlier this year. The Air Force is moving to treat psychological stress faced by remote pilots and analysts a little more like the effects of traditional warfare. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The Warfare May Be Remote But The Trauma Is Real

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Rupert Murdoch (left) with Fox News co-presidents Jack Abernethy and Bill Shine today. Last week, Fox News fired Bill O'Reilly in a move to save a $14 billion dollar deal. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Beyond Sexual Harassment, Lesser Known Scandals Could Cost The Murdochs A $14B Deal

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People walk through Moscow's Red Square in March. Both the House and Senate intelligence committees are investigating Russian interference in last year's presidential election. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

'Unmasking' 101: The Next Chapter In The Trump-Russia Imbroglio

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After a couple of stints behind bars, Angel LaCourt (right) is now a trainer at InnerCity Weightlifting in Boston. Here he works with Bill Gramby, who recently had a stroke and is working out to build strength and stamina. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

A Weightlifting Program Gives Ex-Cons A Chance At Change

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Steven Mallory stands with his family. From left: Tracey Mallory, Steven Mallory, Tina Groves, Zharia Mallory, along with his grandchildren. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Jessica Cheung/NPR

Two Decades Later, Success For Man Who Imagined Turning His Life Around

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a rally in front of the Capitol on March 22. She writes about the middle class and activism in her new book, This Fight Is Our Fight. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Elizabeth Warren's Call To Action: 'This Fight' Will Take Everybody

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Hannah Berkowitz in her parents' home in West Hartford, Conn. Getting intensive in-home drug treatment is what ultimately helped her get back on track, she and her mom agree. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Jack Rodolico/NHPR

Home-Based Drug Treatment Program Costs Less And Works

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Emily Meggett (left) and Isabell Meggett Lucas sit together at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in front of a slave cabin on display that they grew up in. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Woman Returns To Her Slave Cabin Childhood Home In The Smithsonian

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The city of San Francisco has established the new Financial Justice Project to look for ways to make smaller fines, like parking tickets, more fair to poorer residents. Dale Cruse/Flickr hide caption

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Dale Cruse/Flickr

San Francisco Program Aims To Make Fines More Fair For The Poor

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President Trump reaches to shake hands with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during a news conference in the East Room of the White House on Wednesday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump, In A 180-Degree Switch, Says NATO 'No Longer Obsolete'

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (right) and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders at an event at LaGuardia Community College in New York in January. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Here's The Fine Print On The Country's Biggest-Ever Free College Plan

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Passengers at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport wait in line for security screening in May 2016. A study released Monday found that U.S. airline quality is higher than ever, but air travelers may disagree. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images