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Frozen In Time, Remembering The Students Who Changed A Teacher's Life

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Bite into that bread before your main meal, and you'll spike your blood sugar and amp up your appetite. Waiting until the end of your dinner to nosh on bread can blunt those effects. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Curb Your Appetite: Save Bread For The End Of The Meal

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People celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Friday after its historic 5-4 decision on same-sex marriage. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Rulings, Confederate Flag, Mark Shift In Culture Wars

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The Penn State University campus in State College, Pa. A new state law requires university professors to get a background check every three years and have their fingerprints taken. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

After Sandusky, A Debate Over Whether Sex-Abuse Law Goes Too Far

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An illustration of Pappochelys, based on its 240-million-year-old fossilized remains. This ancestor to today's turtle was about 8 inches long. Rainer Schoch/Nature hide caption

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Rainer Schoch/Nature

How The Turtle Got Its Shell

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American Journalist James Foley, pictured in 2011. Foley's beheading at the hands of the Islamic State militant group has forced a debate over how the U.S. balances its policy of not paying ransoms. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Obama Administration To Shift Ransom-For-Hostages Rules

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Marco Rubio speaks to supporters in West Miami in 2010 before declaring his candidacy in the U.S. Senate. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Sights Set On The White House, But It Started In West Miami

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To make Christina Tosi's Bird in a Bag, you'll need a chicken breast or boneless thigh, seasoning, buttermilk (or even bottled ranch dressing), a heavy-duty zip-top freezer bag and a straw. Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle/NPR

Do Try This At Home: Hacking Chicken Sous Vide

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In 1981, Bernie Sanders won a 10-vote victory over a Democratic incumbent to become mayor of Burlington, Vt. Donna Light/AP hide caption

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Donna Light/AP

Leaving Brooklyn, Bernie Sanders Found Home In Vermont

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Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks to members of the media after visiting the memorial site at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., where nine people were killed. John Taggart/EPA/Landov hide caption

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John Taggart/EPA/Landov

Predictably, Democrats, Republicans Don't Agree On Charleston Causes, Solutions

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This clay facial reconstruction of Kennewick Man, who died about 8,500 years ago in what's now southeast Washington, was based on forensic scientists' study of the morphological features of his skull. Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institution

DNA Confirms Kennewick Man's Genetic Ties To Native Americans

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M.C. Davis, former gambler and businessman, stands in his 54,000-acre preserve, Nokuse Plantation, in the Florida Panhandle. It's the largest privately owned conservation area in the southeastern United States. Matt Ozug/NPR hide caption

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Matt Ozug/NPR

Gambler-Turned-Conservationist Devotes Fortune To Florida Nature Preserve

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Hillary Clinton, featured in a high school yearbook with the student council. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Tamara Keith/NPR

Growing Up In Protected Americana, Hillary Clinton Looked Outside The Cocoon

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A surprising number of Social Security numbers have been stolen, and that number keeps rising. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Theft Of Social Security Numbers Is Broader Than You Might Think

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As More Rural Hospitals Close, Advocates Walk To Washington

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