Story of the Day NPR's daily top stories that you can't miss. Exceptional, moving, offbeat, or just plain funny. Subscribe to the Story of the Day podcast.

Story of the Day

There are a record number of jobs open in the United States, but matching the unemployed with the right job is difficult. One problem is that companies are posting openings with required qualifications that aren't really necessary for the job. Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ikon Images/Getty Images

U.S. Employers Struggle To Match Workers With Open Jobs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547646709/547646710" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Troy King navigates his boat through a flooded portion of Highway 90 in Houston on his way to rescue the Galvan family. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Riding With A Rescue Mission In The Surreal, Perilous Texas Floods

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547347581/547373418" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The damage to Houston's economy from Harvey's torrential rainfall will be by one estimate more than $30 billion, a staggering sum. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Economic Impact Of Harvey Could Be Felt Nationwide Before It's Over

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/546714566/546831826" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

American troops use a Jeep in 1943 to clear land for Army camps in England. Fox Photos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fox Photos/Getty Images

Jeep: Why This American Icon Could Soon Be Part Of A Chinese Company

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545771819/545901937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
LA Johnson/NPR

Federal Judge Finds Racism Behind Arizona Law Banning Ethnic Studies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545402866/545617384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Border Patrol vehicle patrols a section of the U.S.-Mexico border fence near Yuma, Ariz. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

FACT CHECK: What Has President Trump Done To Fight Illegal Immigration?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545087674/545314157" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Edward French, 71, was killed in San Francisco on July 11. One of the murder suspects was arrested two weeks before his death for gun possession and parole violations. The suspect was released based on a "public-safety assessment score" — a computer generated score that helps calculate whether a suspect is a flight risk or likely to return to court. Courtesy of Brian Higginbotham hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Brian Higginbotham

Did A Bail Reform Algorithm Contribute To This San Francisco Man's Murder?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543976003/545071450" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Steve Bannon arrives at a swearing-in ceremony of White House senior staff in the East Room of the White House on Jan. 22. Andrew Harrer/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harrer/Pool/Getty Images

Steve Bannon, Out As Chief White House Strategist, Heads Back To Breitbart

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523778912/544523343" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sofia Majed (from left), Samah Safiullah and Noa Turk assist Fatima Diallo as she navigates the ropes course. Maggie Starbard for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Maggie Starbard for NPR

Between Swimming And S'mores, Young Muslim Campers Learn To Cope With Rising Hate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544145281/544259857" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Yuliana Rocha Zamarripa's workers' comp claim for a serious knee injury at work prompted her arrest. She was shuffled from county to immigration jails for a year and blames the sexual abuse of her daughter on her inability to protect her at home. Scott McIntyre for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Scott McIntyre for ProPublica

They Got Hurt At Work — Then They Got Deported

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543650270/543973349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump speaks during a meeting with manufacturing executives at the White House in February, including Merck's Kenneth Frazier (center) and Ford's Mark Fields. Frazier has resigned from the president's manufacturing council. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

CEOs' Dilemma: Supporting Trump's Agenda, Opposing His Behavior

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543722385/543730339" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pastor Daniel Xisto and his son Max, 2, look over a makeshift memorial on Monday for Heather Heyer, who was killed in a car attack on Saturday after a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. While many are calling the attack an act of domestic terrorism, U.S. federal law has no such specific criminal charge. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

Why The Government Can't Bring Terrorism Charges In Charlottesville

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543462676/543477550" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Special counsel Robert Mueller (left) arrives at the U.S. Capitol for a closed meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on June 21. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Mueller Turns Up The Heat With Unusual Search Warrant In Russia Probe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542629755/542867148" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andrew Ladd and Fumiko Chino at their wedding in 2006, after his cancer diagnosis. Ladd died the following year, leaving behind hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical debt. Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino

Widowed Early, A Cancer Doctor Writes About The Harm Of Medical Debt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542589232/542663782" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript