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South Korean President Park Geun-hye walks past a NASA logo during a tour at the agency's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Do You Love Lying In Bed? Get Paid By NASA To Do It For Space Research

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Three seasoned deputies — one with at least 20 years on the force — a detective who happened to be in the area, and two canine officers all responded to the call of a burglary in progress at a Cedar Hills home near Portland, Ore. Instead, they found a trapped robotic vacuum cleaner. Washington County sheriff hide caption

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Washington County sheriff

This 1991 photo became famous in the climbing community after appearing in a 1995 Patagonia catalog. Almost three decades after the photo was taken, Jordan Leads, the baby pictured, is grown up and tells NPR about her perspective on the photo. Greg Epperson hide caption

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Greg Epperson

The Flying Baby From A Famous 1995 Patagonia Catalog Photo Is All Grown Up

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Oregon Authorities Respond To 911 Call, Discover Rogue Roomba

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Security Footage Catches Shoplifter Putting A Chainsaw In His Pants

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Florida Man Is Re-Arrested Just Minutes After His Release

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Beware: Monday's News Stories May Not Be What They seem

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Flamingos flock to Mumbai between September and April, but this year there are almost three times more birds than the amount that usually flocks to the area. Bachchan Kumar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Bachchan Kumar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

More Flamingos Are Flocking to Mumbai Than Ever Before. The Reason Could be Sewage

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