The State of Iraq: Really? : Blog Of The Nation With so many opposing opinions on the state of things in Iraq, what do you believe? Are things improving on the ground, or not?
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The State of Iraq: Really?

The State of Iraq: Really?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91913240/91922556" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A market in Sadr City, where Iraqis must navigate numerous roadblocks to reach services. Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images

We've heard quite a bit lately about progress in Iraq, particularly on the military side. Michael Gordon spent several months this Spring in Iraq, and filed reports like this one in the New York Times:

Iraqi forces rolled unopposed through the huge Shiite enclave of Sadr City on Tuesday, a dramatic turnaround from the bitter fighting that has plagued the Baghdad neighborhood for two months, and a qualified success for Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki.

There's little argument that the situation on the ground in Iraq has improved militarily. Questions do remain on the political and economic fronts, and in the areas of everyday life. So, what is the reality of life in Iraq? Michael Gordon will be here today, to tell us what he saw. And we'll hear from a top analyst at the Government Accountability Office. What do you believe about the state of things in Iraq?