Photographing Casualties : Blog Of The Nation Should photographers be able to take photographs of dead servicemen on the battlefield?
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Photographing Casualties

Photographing Casualties

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Zoriah Miller's story captured my attention from the time I read the headline: 4,000 U.S. Deaths, and a Handful of Images. What does 4,000 dead look like? Then I realized, while dozens of images comes to mind when I think about the war in Iraq, the only images I associate with U.S. casualties are flag draped coffins and Arlington cemetery.

Miller is a freelance photographer who took images of Marines killed in a suicide attack in Iraq, and after he posted them on the Internet, he was barred from covering the Marines.

The Marines say the issue is security. Miller says its censorship.

What do you think? What do you want to see? Are security concerns sanitizing our view of the war in Iraq? Or are journalists overstepping their bounds?