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A statement from former President Donald Trump is seen in front of his Facebook page background. Facebook was justified in its decision to suspend Trump after the Jan. 6 insurrection, the company's Oversight Board said Wednesday. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook indefinitely suspended then-President Donald Trump's accounts in January after a mob of his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Facebook Ban On Donald Trump Will Hold, Social Network's Oversight Board Rules

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A mobile phone customer in Los Angeles looks at an earthquake warning application on an iPhone. An earthquake early warning system operated by the U.S. Geological Survey has been activated in Oregon, California and now Washington. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg addresses the Silicon Slopes Tech Summit in Salt Lake City in January 2020. George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Tech Sees Bigger Opportunity In Utah — If The State Works On Its Image

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a Senate panel in April 2018. On Wednesday, Facebook's independent Oversight Board is set to decide whether the company should keep its indefinite ban on former President Donald Trump. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Reinstate Trump? Facebook Oversight Board Set To Rule On Indefinite Ban

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Epic Games, creator of the popular game Fortnite, accuses Apple of running its App Store as an illegal monopoly because it only allows in-app purchases on iPhones to be processed by Apple's own payment system. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

A 21st Century Union

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Sheffield United's English striker Rhian Brewster joins other players in taking a knee against racism ahead of kick off of the English Premier League football match. Mike Ergerton/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Ergerton/AFP via Getty Images

Can A Social Media Boycott Fight Racism Online? The English Soccer World Hopes So

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NYPD canceled its contract with Boston Dynamics last week after its test run of the company's Spot robot sparked concerns of misuse of city funds and potential police abuse. Josh Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Josh Reynolds/AP

In the Pokémon Snap games, you're not capturing mons and forcing them to fight — you're taking pictures of them in their natural habitats. Screenshot by Kaity Kline/Nintendo hide caption

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Screenshot by Kaity Kline/Nintendo

The new iMac computers are unveiled on April 20 via this illustration at a virtual event in La Habra, Calif. Apple said it could suffer a hit to its revenue as a shortage of chips could affect the production of iPads and Macs. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Anne Neuberger, the deputy national security adviser for cyber and emerging technology, says an upcoming executive order will strengthen U.S. cybersecurity, from setting up new ways to investigate cyberattacks to developing standards for software. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Order To Require New Cybersecurity Standards In Response To SolarWinds Attack

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Washington, D.C., Police Chief Robert Contee addresses reporters in January. The police department has acknowledged that its computer network has been breached by attackers seeking a ransom. Such attacks against local governments, hospitals and corporations have been rising sharply. Bill O'Leary/AP hide caption

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Bill O'Leary/AP

In The Ransomware Battle, Cybercriminals Have The Upper Hand

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