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Food delivery has been a bright spot for Uber during the coronavirus pandemic, as people stuck at home are ordering out more. Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images hide caption

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Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

Uber Gobbles Up Postmates In $2.65 Billion Bet On Food Delivery

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Julian Bass went viral for his superhero video with special effects. Julian Bass/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Julian Bass/Screenshot by NPR

A Theater Student Gets Supersized Attention After Superhero Video Goes Viral

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Dina, the love interest in The Last of Us Part II — is a rare bird in gaming: A relatable Jewish character. Sony Entertainment/Naughty Dog hide caption

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Sony Entertainment/Naughty Dog

Nextdoor CEO Sarah Friar, here in July 2019, tells NPR the popular neighborhood app is taking steps to address reports of racial profiling and censorship on the platform. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

It's 'Our Fault': Nextdoor CEO Takes Blame For Deleting Of Black Lives Matter Posts

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Rashad Robinson is president of Color of Change, one of the groups organizing an advertising boycott of Facebook for the month of July. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

Over 400 Advertisers Hit Pause On Facebook, Threatening $70 Billion Juggernaut

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Reddit announced on Monday that it has banned the popular subreddit for Trump fans called The_Donald. Reddit previously had taken action against the forum over posting content that violated its rules. Reddit.com hide caption

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Reddit.com

Twitter headquarters in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

How Much Have Facebook And Twitter Changed Since 2016?

How much has Big Tech changed since the 2016 election? Sam is joined by Washington Post tech reporters Elizabeth Dwoskin and Tony Romm. They chat about Facebook and Twitter and how their platforms and views on free speech have evolved since the last presidential election. Sam also chats with Washington Post columnist and satirist Alexandra Petri about her book of essays Nothing Is Wrong and Here Is Why and how she uses humor to uncover bigger truths.

How Much Have Facebook And Twitter Changed Since 2016?

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Denise Herzing, dolphin researcher, at TED2013. James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

Denise Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?

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A fan of K-pop band BTS poses for photos against a backdrop featuring an image of the group's members in Seoul, South Korea, on Oct. 29, 2019. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

K-Pop's Digital 'Army' Musters To Meet The Moment, Baggage In Tow

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Passengers have their temperature checked before entering a railway station in the Israeli coastal city of Netanya on June 22. Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images

Michigan State Police ran a facial recognition search for a suspect in Detroit. It suggested the 42-year-old Robert Williams was the suspect. He was arrested and detained. He and his lawyers say the algorithm failed and mistakenly identified him as someone else. Prosecutors have dismissed the case. Detroit Police Department Incident Report hide caption

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Detroit Police Department Incident Report

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

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Get A Comfortable Chair: Permanent Work From Home Is Coming

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Apple reopened some of its stores last month, requiring temperature checks and facial masks for customers. It says it's now closing nearly a dozen stores across four states in which coronavirus cases were climbing. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

People raise their arms while marching on Market Street in San Francisco. As tech companies write statement and pledge money to address racial inequity, some Black tech workers are urging for more fundamental changes in the industry. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Big Talk From Big Tech On Racial Equity, But Not All Workers Are Buying It

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