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A photo demonstrates safety features in a Volvo XC40. Many new cars have optional features that can help prevent accidents. But those same features can also make repairs more expensive, boosting car insurance premiums. Volvo Car Group hide caption

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Volvo Car Group

Why Safer Cars Don't Lead To Cheaper Car Insurance ... Yet

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La Liga, Spain's premier soccer league, was fined 250,000 euros on Tuesday for failing to adequately notify Android app users that it was recording what was going on near their phones. The app was developed to combat piracy, according to the league. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

U.S. Customs and Border Protection security cameras scan license plates as motor vehicles cross the U.S.-Mexico border from Tijuana, Mexico, in September 2016 in San Ysidro, Calif. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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YouTube's decision not to ban a right-wing vlogger for targeting a gay journalist has rekindled debates around hate speech, censorship, and whether companies "walk the walk" of supporting LGBTQ people during Pride Month. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Huawei employees wait for a shuttle bus at the company's campus on April 12 in Shenzhen, China. A senior Huawei official says Google is talking with the U.S. government on behalf of the Chinese telecom giant. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Huawei Chairman Hopeful Google Can Influence U.S. Officials

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Tetris, an addictive brain-teasing video game, is shown as played on the Nintendo Entertainment System in New York, June 1990. Its creator, a Soviet computer programmer, explained the game appeals to people's "constructive spirit." Richard Drew /Associated Press hide caption

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Richard Drew /Associated Press

Happy Birthday, Tetris. 35 Years Later You're As Addictive And Tetromino-y As Ever

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Spam phone calls are the No. 1 consumer complaint at the Federal Communications Commission. Seventy percent of people no longer answer calls they don't recognize, according to Consumer Reports. smartboy10/Getty Images hide caption

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smartboy10/Getty Images

'Do I Know You?' And Other Spam Phone Calls We Can't Get Rid Of

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Elise Hu / NPR

Higher, Better, Stronger, Faster — Brain Science Is Trying To Get There

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A voting line trails outside of a precinct on Election Day 2016 in Durham, N.C. The county's polling places were plagued by malfunctioning equipment to check in voters that day, and it was later revealed that the vendor behind that equipment had been targeted by Russian hackers. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Navy Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher leaves a military courtroom on Naval Base San Diego with his wife, Andrea Gallagher, on May 30. Accused of war crimes, he was released from custody after a military judge cited interference by prosecutors. Julie Watson/AP hide caption

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Julie Watson/AP

Huawei Chairman Liang Hua, shown in 2018, said Tuesday that Huawei is willing to sign a "no-spy agreement" to reassure U.S. leaders who worry the company's technology could be used for surveillance. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG via Getty Images

Huawei Chairman Willing To Sign A 'No-Spy' Deal With The United States

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This illustration taken in April 2018 shows the logo of the iTunes app of Apple displayed on a tablet screen in Paris. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

Remembering iTunes' Cultural Significance

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Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address at the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, Calif., on Monday. The company announced that it's breaking up the iTunes application into three apps handling music, podcasts and TV. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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