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Meta has removed six networks of accounts for abusing its platforms, underscoring the ways bad actors around the world use social media as a tool to promote false information and harass opponents. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter is expanding its ban on users publicizing private information to include videos and images of other people posted without their permission. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

A dozen organisms designed by artificial intelligence known as xenobots (C-shaped; beige) beside loose frog stem cells (white). Douglas Blackiston & Sam Kriegman hide caption

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Douglas Blackiston & Sam Kriegman

Former Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes leaves the Robert F. Peckham Federal Building with her partner Billy Evans. AMY OSBORNE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AMY OSBORNE/AFP via Getty Images

Elizabeth Holmes grilled by prosecutors on witness stand in her criminal fraud trial

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Parag Agrawal, a software engineer known to few outside Twitter, has replaced Jack Dorsey as CEO. Twitter hide caption

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Twitter

Meet Parag Agrawal, Twitter's new CEO

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Elizabeth Holmes, center, leaves federal court in San Jose, Calif., on Nov. 22. The one-time medical entrepreneur now charged with building a fraudulent company based on promises of a revolutionary technology returned to the witness stand Monday. Nic Coury/AP hide caption

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Nic Coury/AP

Jack Dorsey is stepping down as the CEO of Twitter, which he co-founded. Here he's shown at a bitcoin convention in June. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Jack Dorsey steps down as Twitter CEO; Parag Agrawal succeeds him

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Elizabeth Holmes walks into federal court in San Jose, Calif., on Monday. Holmes is accused of duping elite financial backers, customers and patients into believing that her startup was about to revolutionize medicine. Nic Coury/AP hide caption

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Nic Coury/AP

Ex-Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes takes the witness stand in her fraud trial

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Community clinics say the easing of restrictions on telehealth during the pandemic has made it possible for health workers to connect with hard-to-reach patients via a phone call — people who are poor, elderly or live in remote areas, and don't have access to a computer or cellphone with video capability. Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images

Voice-only telehealth may go away with pandemic rules expiring

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The Duck Valley Indian Reservation is home to the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and comprises about 450 square miles along the Idaho/Nevada border. Only one power line goes into it, shown here along Highway 51. Kyle Green for NPR hide caption

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Kyle Green for NPR

Life without reliable internet remains a daily struggle for millions of Americans

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Web3, short for web 3.0, is a vision of the future of the Internet in which people operate on decentralized, quasi-anonymous platforms, rather than depend on tech giants like Google, Facebook and Twitter. Ani_Ka/Getty Images hide caption

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Ani_Ka/Getty Images

People are talking about Web3. Is it the Internet of the future or just a buzzword?

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Tesla drivers can unlock and start their vehicle from the smart phones, which became problematic when the app refused to work Friday. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images) Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

Buy now, pay later and online returns are just a couple of the hidden costs of holiday shopping. the_burtons/Getty Images hide caption

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the_burtons/Getty Images

The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

A lot of consumers are worried about supply chain delays this holiday season — but there are also other issues to watch out for when shopping. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe talks about the hidden costs of holiday consumption with The Atlantic staff writer Amanda Mull and The Washington Post retail reporter Abha Bhattarai. They discuss the potential downfalls of buy now, pay later services and where online shopping returns really go. Then, they play a game of Who Said That?

The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

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