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In this image from video provided by NASA, Steve Altemus, CEO and co-founder of Intuitive Machines, describes how it is believed the company's Odysseus spacecraft landed on the surface of the moon, during a news conference in Houston on Friday, Feb. 23, 2024. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

Samuel Altman, CEO of OpenAI, looks on during a Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology, and the Law oversight hearing to examine artificial intelligence, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on May 16, 2023. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images
JASPER JACOBS/BELGA MAG/AFP/Getty Images

A wind turbine is seen near Pinnacle Wind Farm in Keyser, West Virginia. This onetime coal town is emblematic of a nation-wide attempt to shift to renewable energy. Haiyun Jiang/NPR hide caption

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Haiyun Jiang/NPR

Wind Power Is Taking Over A West Virginia Coal Town. Will The Residents Embrace It?

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The AI-powered Rabbit R1 device is seen at Rabbit Inc.'s headquarters in Santa Monica, California. The gadget is meant to serve as a personal assistant fulfilling tasks such as ordering food on DoorDash for you, calling an Uber or booking your family's vacation. Stella Kalinina for NPR hide caption

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Stella Kalinina for NPR

First there were AI chatbots. Now AI assistants can order Ubers and book vacations

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A voter leaves a polling booth at St. Anthony Community Center in Manchester, N.H., during the state's presidential primary on Jan. 23. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Tech giants pledge action against deceptive AI in elections

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Richmond, Va., joins a growing list of cities that have installed automated enforcement cameras in an effort to cut down on speeding. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

Eyes on the road: Automated speed cameras get a fresh look as traffic deaths mount

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Match Group, which owns dating apps including Tinder and Hinge, was sued on Wednesday in a suit claiming the apps are designed to hook users so the company to make more profit, rather than helping people find romantic partners. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

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Patrick Sison/AP

Flowers, candles and mementos sit outside one of the makeshift memorials at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida just days after the deadly shooting in 2018. Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images

Gun violence killed them. Now, their voices will lobby Congress to do more using AI

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Sean Crimmins, a senior in engineering at the University of Nebraska, loads the robotic arm into its case on Aug. 11 before a shake test. Craig Chandler/University of Nebraska Office of University Communication and Marketing hide caption

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Craig Chandler/University of Nebraska Office of University Communication and Marketing

Dozens of passengers on board the Royal Caribbean's nine-month "Ultimate World Cruise" have gone viral on TikTok since it set sail in December. Captivated viewers are comparing it to a social media reality show. Royal Caribbean/@amike_oosthuizen @brooklyntravelstheworld @spendingourkidsmoney @angielinderman @cooljul1 @aditaml2759 @drjennytravels @marcsebastianf @yourdatingtipbestie @whimsysoul/LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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Royal Caribbean/@amike_oosthuizen @brooklyntravelstheworld @spendingourkidsmoney @angielinderman @cooljul1 @aditaml2759 @drjennytravels @marcsebastianf @yourdatingtipbestie @whimsysoul/LA Johnson/NPR

How a world cruise became a 'TikTok reality show' — and what happened next

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