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Rush hour on Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas. A federal report suggests America's interstates are worn, overused and highly congested. It also recommends billions of dollars in fixes. Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

California predicts mandatory solar panel installations will add nearly $10,000 to the upfront cost of a home — money that will be recouped through energy savings. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Visitors pass a Huawei marquee in Barcelona during the Mobile World Congress last year. The daughter of the Chinese telecommunications giant's founder was arrested Saturday in Canada on U.S. request, in a move that threatens to inflame U.S.-China trade tensions. Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images

Huawei Finance Chief's Arrest Threatens To Inflame U.S.-China Tensions

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The two men face federal charges of infecting Atlanta's computers with their SamSam ransomware. The suspects have previously been charged in a similar scheme in New Jersey. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Cuba's telecom monopoly is rolling out broad Internet access for mobile phone users this week. Here, a woman uses her smartphone to surf the Internet in Havana. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Desmond Boylan/AP

The hacking was first detected in April, but top GOP officials, including House Speaker Paul Ryan, weren't notified about the attack until Monday, when reporters began asking questions. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

The reasons for why Americans and Canadians choose to tweet differently is difficult to determine. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Pollack/NPR

Study Shows Americans Are Meaner On Twitter Than Canadians

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The Mozilla Foundation made what amounts to a "naughty list" of products that lack security. Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Is Your Holiday Gift Spying On You? A Guide Rates The Security Of Smart Devices

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Marriott said that for 327 million guests of its Starwood network, which includes Westin hotels like this one near San Francisco, the compromised data includes dates of birth and passport numbers. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Marriott Says Up To 500 Million Customers' Data Stolen In Breach

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A security guard stands in front of Google's booth at the China International Import Expo earlier this month in Shanghai. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

'We're Taking A Stand': Google Workers Protest Plans For Censored Search In China

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Different apples need different controlled storage environments. For example, Honeycrisps are sensitive to low temperatures so you can't put them in cold environments right after they've been harvested. And Fujis can't take high carbon dioxide levels. Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Getty Images/Westend61

Genetics researcher He Jiankui said his lab considered ethical issues before deciding to proceed with DNA editing of human embryos to create twin girls with a modification to reduce their risk of HIV infection. Critics say the experiment was premature. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR

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