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The bill to boost semiconductor production in the United States has been a top priority of the Biden administration. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Why Biden's plan to boost semiconductor chip manufacturing in the U.S. is so critical

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Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) Director Jen Easterly testifies before a House Homeland Security Subcommittee, at the Rayburn House Office Building on April 28 in Washington, D.C. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Patricia Neves (left) and Ana Paula Ano Bom helped launch a global project to revolutionize access to mRNA technology. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

An employee looks at a vanadium flow battery in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Battery Reliability Laboratory in 2021. Andrea Starr/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory hide caption

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Andrea Starr/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

How The U.S. Gave Away Cutting-Edge Technology To China

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President Biden signed the CHIPS and Science Act on the South Lawn of the White House on Tuesday. The legislation is aimed at boosting the domestic production of semiconductors. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Snapchat is rolling out new parental controls that allow parents to see their teenager's contacts and confidentially report to the social media company any accounts that concern them. A child lies in bed illuminated by the glow of a cell phone. Elva Etienne/Getty Images hide caption

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Elva Etienne/Getty Images

Snapchat's new parental controls try to mimic real-life parenting, minus the hovering

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An iRobot Terra lawn mower is shown in Bedford, Mass., on Jan. 16, 2019. Amazon on Friday announced an agreement to acquire iRobot for approximately $1.7 billion. iRobot sells its robots worldwide and is most famous for the circular-shaped Roomba vacuum. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

A video showing Alex Jones is shown as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing on July 12. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

The former UniEnergy Technologies office in Mukilteo, Wash. Taxpayers spent $15 million on research to build a breakthrough battery. Then the U.S. government gave it to China. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

The U.S. made a breakthrough battery discovery — then gave the technology to China

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People wait in line for T-shirts at a pop-up kiosk for the online brokerage Robinhood in New York City after the company went public on July 29, 2021. On Tuesday, the company said it was cutting nearly a quarter of its staff. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Air Force service members run a timed 1.5 miles during their annual physical fitness test at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois in June. The U.S. Space Force intends to do away with once-a-year assessments in favor of wearable technology. Eric Schmid/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Eric Schmid/St. Louis Public Radio
Valeriy Kachaev/Spruce Books

How to know when you spend too much time online and need to log off

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A robot plays a game of chess against a man in 1985. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Opinion: Are robots masters of strategy, and also grudges?

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Austin Acocella, co-owner of Acocella Landscaping in Westchester County, N.Y., is holding onto his gas-powered mowers. He says electric ride-ons are too expensive for him to switch right now. Matthew Schuerman hide caption

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Matthew Schuerman

Professional landscapers are reluctant to plug into electric mowers due to cost

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Wikipedia has locked its page for "recession," setting restrictions on who can edit the entry until next week. The freeze was set after editors made a series of revisions to the definition of "recession." Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

What is a recession? Wikipedia can't decide

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These emojis will have to make room for the new additions coming later this year. TENGKU BAHAR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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TENGKU BAHAR/AFP via Getty Images

Only 31 new emojis will be introduced this year as approvals slow to a trickle

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Ernie Wright stands near the James Webb Space Telescope mirrors as they sit just outside the testing chamber in the x-ray calibration facility at MSFC. David Higginbotham/Getty Images hide caption

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David Higginbotham/Getty Images

Facebook is revamping its default feed to include more recommended posts and videos from strangers, picked by artificial intelligence. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook

Facebook is making radical changes to keep up with TikTok

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