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Danielle Citron: What Happens In A World Where Fake Becomes Real?

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Black Lives Matter protesters display wristbands reading "I Voted" after leaving a polling place this month in Louisville, Ky. Activists warn Black and Latino voters are being flooded with disinformation intended to suppress turnout in the election's final days. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Black And Latino Voters Flooded With Disinformation In Election's Final Days

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U.S. federal agencies sent an alert Wednesday night that there is "credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat" to hospitals and healthcare providers. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies remotely during a Senate Commerce Committee hearing Wednesday about reforms to Section 230, a key legal shield for tech companies. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images

Days Before Election, Tech CEOs Defend Themselves From GOP Accusations Of Censorship

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify on Wednesday before the Senate Commerce Committee about a legal shield known as Section 230. Jose Luis Magana, LM Otero, Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana, LM Otero, Jens Meyer/AP

Facebook, Twitter, Google CEOs Testify To Senate: What To Watch For

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A federal lawsuit alleges that Uber's star rating system discriminates against drivers of color and those with accents. According to the suit, Uber terminates drivers whose ratings get too low. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Uber and Lyft have been fighting a California labor law that would require them to treat drivers as employees rather than independent contractors. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Over the past week, users of TikTok began absorbing, in a "challenge," one artist's musical investigation into the realities of living through a degenerative neurological disorder. @kadanharne and @quinfinity/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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@kadanharne and @quinfinity/Screenshot by NPR

The Justice Department says Google CEO Sundar Pichai (left) met privately with Apple chief Tim Cook in 2018 to discuss how their two companies could collaborate. Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images

Google Paid Apple Billions To Dominate Search On iPhones, Justice Department Says

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An election worker uses an electronic pollbook to check voters at a polling station in the Echo Park Recreation Complex in Los Angeles on March 3, 2020. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Voter Websites In California And Florida Could Be Vulnerable To Hacks, Report Finds

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LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images

Hey Google, Are You Too Big?

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On Tuesday, the Department of Justice and 11 Republican state attorneys general filed an antitrust suit against Google, accusing it of being a "monopoly gatekeeper for the internet." SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

Arkansas AG On Google Antitrust Suit: 'I Don't Want What Google Says Is Best'

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The Justice Department alleges Google has an illegal monopoly in search, setting up the biggest confrontation with a tech giant in more than 20 years. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Google Lawsuit Marks End Of Washington's Love Affair With Big Tech

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The U.S. Justice Department is suing Google, accusing the tech giant of breaking antitrust laws as it has amassed power and grown into the world's most dominant search engine. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Google Abuses Its Monopoly Power Over Search, Justice Department Says In Lawsuit

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This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 images collected on Dec. 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

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