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In numerous recent interviews, educators have told NPR they're concerned the rural-urban divide will only worsen if kids can't get online to learn. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

In this photo illustration a mobile phone screen displays TikTok logo in front of a keyboard. Mustafa Murat Kaynak/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Mustafa Murat Kaynak/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

U.S. Judge Halts Trump's TikTok Ban, Hours Before It Was Set To Start

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The Justice Department lawyers say ByteDance CEO Zhang Yiming has made public statements showing he is "committed to promoting" the agenda of the Chinese Communist Party. Gilles Sabrie/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gilles Sabrie/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Civil rights groups and other critics say the social network has not done enough to curb misinformation, hate speech and voter suppression ahead of the U.S. presidential election. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

A screenshot of an Instagram post Facebook linked to Russia's Internet Research Agency. United World International was a phony website created by the Russian operation and promoted on social media. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook

Attorney General William Barr and President Donald Trump want to pare back longstanding legal protections for Internet platforms. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Huda Mohamed, a student at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., has an immunodeficiency. She decided to take extra precautions by using Virginia's COVIDWISE app, which alerts users who may have been exposed to the coronavirus. Such apps are only available in a few states. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

A Tech Powerhouse, U.S. Lags In Using Smartphones For Contact Tracing

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Buildings are engulfed in flames as a wildfire ravages Talent, Ore., on Sept. 8, 2020. Unfounded rumors that left-wing activists were behind the fires went viral on social media, thanks to amplification by conspiracy theorists and the platforms' own design. Kevin Jantzer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Jantzer/AP

Can Circuit Breakers Stop Viral Rumors On Facebook, Twitter?

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Facebook says the fake accounts it removed focused mainly on Southeast Asia. But they also included some content about the U.S. election, which did not gain a large following. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Microsoft announced Monday that it will acquire ZeniMax Media, the parent company of popular video game publisher Bethesda, for $7.5 billion. Here, a Microsoft store is shown in March in New York City. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

President Trump said he approved a deal struck with U.S. companies Oracle and Walmart to keep TikTok alive, but the agreement does not accomplish what the president sought to achieve. Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images

How Hackers Could Fool Artificial Intelligence

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A federal judge in San Francisco has blocked the Trump administration's order that would have banned Chinese-owned app WeChat, which millions in the U.S. use to stay in touch with family and friends and conduct business in China Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

President Trump speaks to members of the media before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in July. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

TikTok Ban Averted: Trump Gives Oracle-Walmart Deal His 'Blessing'

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Icons for the smartphone apps TikTok and WeChat are seen on a smartphone screen in Beijing. President Trump said he does not plan to support any deal to save TikTok in the U.S. that keeps China-based ByteDance as its majority owner. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP