Technology Latest technology news and breakthroughs in technology, science, and industry. Download the NPR Technology podcast and Technology RSS feed.

Technology

An iPhone screengrab of Snapchat's speed filter, which allows users to record and share how fast they are moving. Snap told NPR that it is eliminating the tool. Bobby Allyn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bobby Allyn/NPR

Snapchat Ends 'Speed Filter' That Critics Say Encouraged Reckless Driving

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007385955/1007851240" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee is selling the source code for the World Wide Web as an NFT. Here, Berners-Lee delivers a speech during an event at the CERN in Meyrin near Geneva, Switzerland. Fabrice Coffrini/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Fabrice Coffrini/AP

U.S. and Russian flags fly on the Mont-Blanc bridge on the eve of a US-Russia summit on Tuesday in Geneva. A former intelligence operative says agencies are in high gear. Sebastien Bozon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sebastien Bozon/AFP via Getty Images

Why Geneva Is Teeming With Spies As Biden And Putin Prepare To Meet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1006810293/1006861832" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Senate on Tuesday confirmed to the Federal Trade Commission 32-year-old Lina Khan, a prominent critic of Big Tech and favorite among progressives. Graeme Jennings/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Graeme Jennings/AP

Lina Khan, Prominent Big Tech Critic, Will Lead The FTC

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1006807299/1007047634" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Janelia's cafeteria, which was noisy and crowded in pre-pandemic times, now operates a contactless takeout system. Sarah Silbiger for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Silbiger for NPR

It's Personal: Zoom'd Out Workplace Ready For Face-To-Face Conversations To Return

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005105667/1006149678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Participants sit a Blue Origin space simulator during a conference on robotics and artificial intelligence in Las Vegas on June 5, 2019. On Saturday, Blue Origin announced that an unidentified bidder will pay $28 million for a suborbital flight on the company's New Shepard vehicle. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

Clippings from the Great Falls Tribune were part of the Cascade County Sheriff's Office investigative file into the 1956 murders of Patricia Kalitzke and Lloyd Duane Bogle. Traci Rosenbaum/USA Today Network via Reuters Co. hide caption

toggle caption
Traci Rosenbaum/USA Today Network via Reuters Co.

Apple announced this week at its Worldwide Developer Conference a new feature in its forthcoming operating system, iOS 15, that will digitize state-issued licenses and ID cards. Apple hide caption

toggle caption
Apple

Apple iPhones Can Soon Hold Your ID. Privacy Experts Are On Edge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005624457/1005625533" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A sign is displayed outside a McDonald's restaurant in Des Moines, Iowa. The company said customers' personal data in South Korea and Taiwan was accessed in a data breach. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Neibergall/AP
Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Social Audio Began As A Pandemic Fad. Tech Companies See It As The Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005304644/1005670701" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The government of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is in a standoff with social media companies over what content gets investigated or blocked online, and who gets to decide. Bikas Das/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bikas Das/AP

India And Tech Companies Clash Over Censorship, Privacy And 'Digital Colonialism'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1004387255/1004401365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

As ransomware cases surge, the cyber criminals almost almost always demand, and receive, payment in cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. The world's largest meat supplier, JBS, announced Wednesday that it paid $11 million in Bitcoin to hackers in a recent ransomware attack. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

toggle caption
SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

How Bitcoin Has Fueled Ransomware Attacks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1004874311/1005019850" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript