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Employees work on automobile parts at a production line at the BMW factory in Shenyang, China, on Nov. 22. Twelve percent of workers in China could need to switch jobs by 2030, researchers say. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Attorney General Jeff Sessions appears before the House Judiciary Committee earlier this month in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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An Amazon Echo, circa 2015, perched on a table beside a lamp. Not pictured: the actual Amazon Echo referenced in the case against James Bates. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

American Airlines is offering its pilots 150 percent of their hourly pay to work during the holidays, after a glitch allowed too many pilots to take vacation at the same time. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Considers Cellphones And Digital Privacy

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The U.S. Supreme Court confronts the digital age again on Wednesday. At issue is whether police have to get a search warrant in order to obtain cellphone location information that is routinely collected and stored by wireless providers. Georgijevic/Getty Images hide caption

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Amid reports of disturbing kid-oriented content and pedophilic comments on its site, YouTube says it is increasing enforcement of guidelines relating to content featuring or targeting children. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto Rico, says computer-operated milling machines like this one can cost more than a half-million dollars. Heat and humidity in the plant after Hurricane Maria left many of the machines inoperable, Haley says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Puerto Rico's Medical Manufacturers Worry Federal Tax Plan Could Kill Storm Recovery

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