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People work in a call center of Covidom, a new remote medical monitoring app, inside the Paris public hospitals' Campus Picpus last month. Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt/AFP via Getty Images

An Event Designer Gives Advice On How To Celebrate Online

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Willy Solis, who delivers groceries for the app Shipt in Denton, Texas, says the coronavirus pandemic has elevated the voices of workers like him, who are risking their lives to do essential jobs. Courtesy of Willy Solis hide caption

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Courtesy of Willy Solis

More Essential Than Ever, Low-Wage Workers Demand More

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Airbnb co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky told NPR he is "very confident" the company can still go public in 2020 despite the coronavirus upending the travel and hospitality industry. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

For Airbnb, 2020 Was Supposed To Be A Banner Year. Then The Pandemic Hit

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The Democracy Live homepage is displayed on a laptop. The company is administering a ballot return system for disabled voters in West Virginia, Delaware and, potentially, New Jersey. Chona Kasinger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chona Kasinger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

States Expand Internet Voting Experiments Amid Pandemic, Raising Security Fears

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Workers at Amazon's Staten Island, N.Y., warehouse staged a protest demanding that the facility be closed following several confirmed cases of the coronavirus among staff. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

A woman walks past a vending machine that offers washable face masks in a Berlin subway station on Monday. German officials have said they will endorse a decentralized approach to coronavirus contact tracing. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

Distance Learning Methods Differ Notably Across The U.S.

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Health vs. Privacy: How Other Countries Use Surveillance To Fight The Pandemic

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As he was defending his dissertation, Dennis Johnson's Zoom video conference was interrupted by an unknown intruder. Johnson hopes his bad experience will bring better protections to the platform. Courtesy of Dennis Johnson hide caption

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Courtesy of Dennis Johnson