The Salt The Salt is a blog from the NPR Science Desk about what we eat and why we eat it. We serve up food stories with a side of skepticism that may provoke you or just make you smile.
Jenn Liv for NPR

Personalized Diets: Can Your Genes Really Tell You What To Eat?

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A kamayan is a communal-style Filipino feast, composed of colorful arrays of food that are usually served on banana leaves and eaten without utensils. Bettina Makalintal/NPR hide caption

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Bettina Makalintal/NPR

Already, Ripple has expanded its offerings to include a creamy half-and-half and, this month, a Greek-style yogurt, both of which can be used in cooking. Caitlin Maddox-Smith/Ripple Foods hide caption

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Caitlin Maddox-Smith/Ripple Foods

Microorganisms play a vital role in growing food and sustaining the planet, but they do it anonymously. Scientists haven't identified most soil microbes, but they are learning which are most common. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Scientists Peek Inside The 'Black Box' Of Soil Microbes To Learn Their Secrets

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In one study, participants who routinely got less than seven hours of sleep were coached to extend their sleep time. They also changed their diets, without being asked — taking in less sugar each day. Jenny Dettrick/Getty Images hide caption

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Jenny Dettrick/Getty Images

A grande Cafe Nero, large Costa Coffee and venti-sized Starbucks to-go cups sold in London. The U.K. Parliament is considering a tax on disposable cups in an effort to cut down on waste. Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images

Patrick States slices into a venison steak at his home in Northglenn, Colo. Officials are asking hunters to have their kills tested before consuming the meat. Sam Brasch/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Sam Brasch/Colorado Public Radio

An engineer shows a sample of biodiesel at an industrial complex in General Lagos, Santa Fe province, Argentina. The United States recently imposed duties on Argentine biodiesel, blocking it from the U.S. market. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

After Charleston chef Ben Murray committed suicide, Mickey Bakst (left) and Steve Palmer (right) started a support group for those in the restaurant business struggling with addiction. Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications hide caption

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Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications

Georgia Gilmore adjusts her hat for photographers in 1956 during the bus boycott trial of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Montgomery, Ala. She testified: "When you pay your fare and they count the money, they don't know the Negro money from white money." AP hide caption

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AP

Meet The Fearless Cook Who Secretly Fed — And Funded — The Civil Rights Movement

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Beyond ingredients and recipes, Guinness has used aggressive exporting and clever marketing to become a global brand. Jirka Matousek/Flickr hide caption

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Jirka Matousek/Flickr

Behind The Genius Of Guinness, Ireland's Most Popular Tourist Attraction

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Julia prepares tortillas for her family's dinner before she sets up her table to sell elote and atole from her driveway. Some New York City street vendors have started selling out of their homes to reduce their visibility and risk of being detained or deported. Rachael Bongiorno for NPR hide caption

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Rachael Bongiorno for NPR

John Locke lounges at home. Owners often say they don't care if their pet is "fat" — there's just more to love! Courtesy of Rebecca Flanagan hide caption

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Courtesy of Rebecca Flanagan

A head of poor-quality malt barley taken directly from a field in Power, Mont. Heat and a lack of water resulted in small and light kernels. Grain rejected for malt barley often ends up as animal feed. Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network hide caption

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Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network

Alfonso Verdis came to the U.S. from Mexico at age 15, working his way from dishwasher to executive chef in an industry that relies heavily on immigrant labor. But his DACA status in the U.S. will soon expire. Rachael Bongiorno for NPR hide caption

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Rachael Bongiorno for NPR

President Trump speaks at the American Farm Bureau Federation's annual convention in Nashville, Tenn., on Monday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Color really does impact our perception of taste — even if the ingredients are otherwise the same, scientists say. It's something candy companies use to their advantage. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images