The Salt The Salt is a blog from the NPR Science Desk about what we eat and why we eat it. We serve up food stories with a side of skepticism that may provoke you or just make you smile.
The Salt

The Salt

What's On Your Plate

At Odell Brewing Company in Fort Collins, Colo., Scott Dorsch pulls down a box of hops from the Yakima Valley in Washington, the state that grows the most hops in the nation. "We would buy more hops than what Colorado could produce," he says. Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media

Reporter Nate Hegyi helps butcher an elk during a hunting workshop in McCall, Idaho. Michael Hegyi hide caption

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Michael Hegyi

Opinion: What My Dad And I Learned In Hunting Class

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A customer holds a McDonald's Big Mac. The fast-food giant, one of the world's biggest beef buyers, has announced plans to use its might to cut back on antibiotics in its global beef supply. Environmentalists are applauding the commitment. Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Thomas "Uptown T" Stewart (left), has been shucking oysters at Pascal's Manale restaurant for more than 30 years, about as long as Paula (middle) and Brent Coussou have been going there. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

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Travis Lux/WWNO

Researchers say they've found a way to let queen bees pass on immunity to a devastating disease called American foulbrood. The infectious disease is so deadly, many states and beekeeping groups recommend burning any hive that's been infected. Here, a frame from a normal hive is seen in a photo from 2017. Bernadett Szabo/Reuters hide caption

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Bernadett Szabo/Reuters

Sugar maple trees need snow to keep their roots warm. This allows them to grow fast enough to help maintain people's livelihoods while also absorbing carbon dioxide emissions. Jonathan Lesage/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Lesage/Getty Images

Samin Nosrat travels to different countries to learn how salt, acid, fat and heat affect food on her four-part Netflix series. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

On Netflix, Chef Samin Nosrat Goes Global To Demystify 'Salt Fat Acid Heat'

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Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev (left) and former U.S. President George H.W. Bush share a light moment together outside the White House in 1990. Could they be discussing chicken? Ron Sachs/ Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Sachs/ Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images

Chicken Diplomacy: How President Bush Went For The Gut In The Former USSR

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Dungeness crab like these, caught off the coast of Alaska, have been affected by the neurotoxin domoic acid because of algae blooms in recent years, which makes them unsafe to eat. Michael Melford/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Melford/Getty Images

Unless you're an extreme athlete, recovering from an injury, or over 60, you probably need only 50 to 60 grams of protein a day. And you probably already get that in your food without adding pills, bars or powders. Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR hide caption

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Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?

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The cover of a 1933 cookbook, Crisco Recipes For The Jewish Housewife, produced by Crisco's parent company Procter & Gamble, to promote the vegetable-based oil to the new wave of Jewish immigrants. from The New York Public Library (public domain) hide caption

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from The New York Public Library (public domain)

How A Corporation Convinced American Jews To Reach For Crisco

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Hundreds of public housing residents are becoming food entrepreneurs thanks to Food Business Pathways, a free 10-week program that offers food-loving New York City Housing Authority residents customized business training and resources. New York City Housing Authority hide caption

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New York City Housing Authority

Different apples need different controlled storage environments. For example, Honeycrisps are sensitive to low temperatures so you can't put them in cold environments right after they've been harvested. And Fujis can't take high carbon dioxide levels. Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Getty Images/Westend61

Erick Castro photographs his vegan fried-oyster-mushroom po'boy outside of a Whole Foods in Brooklyn. The sandwich is made by local vegan food business Chickpea and Olive and sold inside Whole Foods. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Gabriela, 32, a strawberry picker from Oaxaca, Mexico, who lives in Oxnard, Calif., had to wear a bandanna to cover her nose and mouth to avoid inhaling smoke from a wildfire while working in the fields. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Many California Farmworkers Forced To Stay Behind During The Wildfires

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London Mayor Sadiq Khan announced a ban on junk food advertisements across the city's transportation network on Friday. The new rules will take effect on Feb. 25, 2019. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images