For Foodies : The Salt Here you'll find information on the unique ingredients, fancy techniques, new ideas and celebrations of the good food, fancy or plain, that you're craving right now.

For Foodies

Bassam Ghraoui, who ran Syria's most famous chocolate factory, left for Hungary when war consumed his home country. He successfully rebuilt his business in Budapest. The company still uses ingredients from Syria. Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

A Syrian Chocolatier's Legend Lives On In Europe — But Stays Close To Its Roots

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When Corsair Distillery in Nashville, Tenn., wanted to start experimenting with alternative grains, there wasn't a playbook to follow. Now, it makes a quinoa-barley whiskey. Ashlie Stevens/WFPL hide caption

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Ashlie Stevens/WFPL

Beloved in eastern Asia, especially Japan, persimmons get little respect in the United States, where many tree owners don't bother harvesting their crop. Alastair Bland/for NPR hide caption

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Alastair Bland/for NPR

An employee at Grand Traverse Pie Co. in Michigan makes cherry pies. The company has been shipping pies since 1998, when people still had to phone in their orders. Beryl Striewski/Grand Traverse Pie Co. hide caption

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Beryl Striewski/Grand Traverse Pie Co.

For this year's grand prize winner, the judges were impressed by the intricate, working gingerbread gears of the clock inside Santa's workshop. Kristen Hartke/NPR hide caption

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Kristen Hartke/NPR

Josh Davis tends to his hog herd on his farm in Pocahontas, Ill. Once a popular breed, there are now only a few hundred American mulefoot hogs left. David Kovaluk/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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David Kovaluk/St. Louis Public Radio

Carla Hall has a new book that explores her heritage and attempts to bring soul food to a wider audience. She embarked on a long journey through the South to investigate and get inspiration, and the story is a deep look into her philosophy. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

In Soul Food Cookbook, Chef Carla Hall Celebrates Black Culinary Heritage

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Betsy Leyva is co-owner of a Brooklyn, N.Y., bakery that has an online-only restaurant, with deliveries by Uber Eats. Jasmine Garsd/NPR hide caption

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Jasmine Garsd/NPR

Uber's Online-Only Restaurants: The Future, Or The End Of Dining Out?

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Molly Birnbaum, America's Test Kitchen Kids editor in chief, helps 8-year-old Lucy Gray make a one-pot pasta meal from a recipe in the new book, The Complete Cookbook for Young Chefs. Courtesy of Paul Gray hide caption

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Courtesy of Paul Gray

What's Cookin', Kiddo? America's Test Kitchen Unveils Book For Young Chefs

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Sam Richman, owner-chef of Sammy's Deluxe restaurant in Rockland, says his patrons tend to prefer full-grown unagi smoked, European style, rather than as Japanese sushi. Keith Shortall/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Keith Shortall/Maine Public Radio

Geoff Walser picks out a ristra, a wreath-like decoration made from dried chiles, to purchase at the annual Pueblo Chile and Frijoles Festival, which draws thousands of chile lovers from Colorado and beyond. Andy Cross/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/Denver Post/Getty Images

The champagne grape harvest in northeastern France, like this one near Mailly-Champagne, started early this year due to lack of rain. Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

Champagne Makers Bubble Over A Bumper Crop Caused By European Drought

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Assistant chef Michael Monteleone puts a finishing touch on cannabis-infused vegetable tarts. As more states legalize the use of recreational marijuana, the California chef is aiming to elevate haute cuisine to a new level. Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images

Haute Pot: How High-End California Chefs Are Cashing In On Marijuana

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Brick transfers heat to dough more slowly than steel, allowing both pizza crust and toppings to simultaneously reach perfection. Aldo Pavan/Getty Images hide caption

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Aldo Pavan/Getty Images

Brian Kleinsasser, left, who works in the hog barn at Cool Spring Colony, helps Jake Waldner set up the Hutterite table during a Long Table dinner event at The Resort at Paws Up. Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up hide caption

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Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up