For Foodies : The Salt Here you'll find information on the unique ingredients, fancy techniques, new ideas and celebrations of the good food, fancy or plain, that you're craving right now.

For Foodies

A flock of Texel-Dorset sheep gather near a hay trough in a Hudson River Valley barn in Medusa, N.Y. Millennials and more experimental diners might be open to eating mutton. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

A vineyard worker drives a grape harvester tractor in the Bordeaux region of southwestern France, where climate change is raising new challenges for winemakers. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Disrupting Centuries-Old Methods Of Winemaking In France

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Nattapong Kaweeantawong, a third-generation owner of Wattana Panich, stirs the soup while his mother (left) helps serve and his wife (center) does other jobs at the restaurant. Nattapong or another family member must constantly stir the thick brew. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Soup's On! And On! Thai Beef Noodle Brew Has Been Simmering For 45 Years

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A Swedish government program called the Edible Country recruited Michelin-starred chefs to create recipes that use ingredients that can be foraged from the areas around 13 picnic tables scattered across the countryside. Diners book a table, show up and hunt for their own food. Tina Stafrén/Visit Sweden hide caption

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Tina Stafrén/Visit Sweden

Illustration from a 19th-century edition of Robinson Crusoe, a novel by Daniel Defoe first published in 1719. It relates the story of Robinson Crusoe, stranded on an island for 28 years and his subsequent fight for survival. Out of desperation, he became a master of innovation, especially at preparing meals. Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

This toad-shaped sandwich bar called the Toed In, near Los Angeles in 1939, allowed you to grab a bite to eat while your car got serviced. There's a lot of wordplay going on here: the toad-shaped building, the "towing in" of the car, and the stepping or "toeing" in for a snack. Good job, punsters! Ullstein Bild/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Ullstein Bild/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images

Jarret Stopforth, a food scientist and one of the founders of Atomo, reengineered the compounds in regular coffee with his partner until he felt they had created a product that had the same color, aroma, flavor and mouthfeel. Courtesy of Atomo hide caption

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Courtesy of Atomo

Chef Jay Fai wears a wool cap and safety goggles to ward off the heat from the charcoal fires in the alley where she cooks all of the restaurant's meals. She is such a perfectionist that she doesn't let anyone on her staff do the cooking. Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

Meet The 74-Year-Old Queen Of Bangkok Street Food Who Netted A Michelin Star

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A handful of young upstarts are changing Naples' traditional pizza-making habits, bolstered by a new flour called Nuvola (Italian for "cloud"), developed by Italian miller Caputo. Courtesy of Carlo Sammarco hide caption

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Courtesy of Carlo Sammarco

A suicidal depression almost ended Ella Risbridger's life, but the London poet and journalist instead ended up writing an uplifting cookbook that promises to "make you fall in love with the world again." Courtesy of Gavin Day hide caption

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Courtesy of Gavin Day

Charles Brain helps hand harvest grapes in a Shiraz vineyard in the Swartland wine region of South Africa. Lubanzi Wines, which was started by Brain and his partner, Walker Brown, earned its B Corp certification this year. Christopher Grava/Courtesy of Lubanzi Wines hide caption

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Christopher Grava/Courtesy of Lubanzi Wines

Seedlip, a distilled nonalcoholic spirit, was created when Ben Branson came across a 17th-century book that contained nonalcoholic remedies for a variety of maladies — from epilepsy to kidney stones. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images