For Foodies : The Salt Here you'll find information on the unique ingredients, fancy techniques, new ideas and celebrations of the good food, fancy or plain, that you're craving right now.

For Foodies

Magida Safaoui, right, and an assistant plate tomatoes at a Trio Toques event in April. Safaoui helps out the three chefs who run the restaurant. Doreen Akiyo Yomoah for NPR hide caption

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Doreen Akiyo Yomoah for NPR

Ian Burrell, a rum ambassador from the U.K., samples the liquor at the Miami Rum Festival. Tatu Kaarlas/Courtesy of Miami Rum Festival hide caption

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Tatu Kaarlas/Courtesy of Miami Rum Festival

Rum Renaissance Revives The Spirit's Rough Reputation

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President Obama shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe before a private dinner at Sukiyabashi Jiro in Tokyo on Wednesday. At Sukiyabashi Jiro, people pay a minimum of $300 for 20 pieces of sushi chosen by the patron, Jiro Ono. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

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The holes in matzo give the cracker its characteristic crunch, Odelia Cohen/iStockphoto hide caption

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Odelia Cohen/iStockphoto

A Love Letter To Matzo: Why The Holey Cracker Is A Crunch Above

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"The egg is a lens through which to view the entire craft of cooking," says food writer Michael Ruhlman. Donna Turner Ruhlman hide caption

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Donna Turner Ruhlman

Think You Know How To Cook Eggs? Chances Are You're Doing It Wrong

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