For Foodies : The Salt Here you'll find information on the unique ingredients, fancy techniques, new ideas and celebrations of the good food, fancy or plain, that you're craving right now.

For Foodies

Cooked Burgundy snails in garlic butter. These snails are a popular French delicacy. These days they are imported into France from other European countries. tirc83/Getty Images hide caption

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tirc83/Getty Images

Hamilton-inspired cupcake toppers. It was only a matter of time before fans of the Broadway hit sought out culinary tributes to their most treasured folk hero. Courtesy of Alexis Murphy hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexis Murphy

The YouTube Star Who's Teaching Kids How To Bake

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An image of Penicillium colonies. The white colony is a mutant similar to the mold found in Camembert cheese. The green ones are the wild form. Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe

Amelia Earhart eats dinner at a Cleveland hotel. Her in-flight menu, however, was usually simple, often consisting of tomato juice and a hard-boiled egg. Louis Van Oeyen/Western Reserve Historical Society/Getty Images hide caption

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Louis Van Oeyen/Western Reserve Historical Society/Getty Images

NPR journalist Alina Selyukh makes oreshki, a cookie from the former Soviet Union. The walnut-shaped cookies, which have a rich, nutty filling, were popular during a time when people had to make do with limited ingredients. NPR hide caption

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Courtesy of Mable Gray

Summer Potluck Dishes To Withstand The Heat And Please Crowds

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Bartender Robin Miller mixes a round of mezcal margaritas at Espita Mezcaleria in Washington, D.C. As U.S. drinkers embrace mezcal, investors are flocking south to the heart of Mexico's mezcal country, and local incomes are rising. Kevin Leahy/NPR hide caption

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Kevin Leahy/NPR

America's Growing Taste For Mezcal Is Good For Mexico's Small Producers

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Slobodan Simic, a former Serbian parliamentarian, now runs the largest donkey farm in eastern Europe, located fifty miles from Belgrade. He's trying to finance the protection of the Balkan donkey by selling donkey-milk products, which are said to promote health and beauty. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

A Serbian Farmer Wants To Protect The Balkan Donkey By Selling Its Pricey Milk

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Chef Michael Scelfo of Cambridge, Mass., left, and Lisa Carlson, who operates three food trucks in Minneapolis, collaborate on the Glynwood dinner's spelt salad with lamb tongues and hearts, and "ugly" cherries, shiitakes, and kale. Lela Nargi/NPR hide caption

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Lela Nargi/NPR

Ten international cheesemongers competed to be named the best cheesemonger in the world at Mondial du Fromage. Nathalie Vanhaver, from Belgium, in center, took gold. Christophe Gonzalez, from France, on the left, won silver; and for the first time ever, an American, Nadjeeb Chouaf, took home the bronze. Courtesy of Rodolphe Le Meunier/Deedee Dorzee hide caption

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Courtesy of Rodolphe Le Meunier/Deedee Dorzee

Analysts say that the experience of shopping at Whole Foods might change in the near future now that the retailer is being bought by Amazon. Stephen Hilger/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Hilger/Bloomberg/Getty Images

The Zirlott family's oyster farm is at the end of a long pier in Sandy Bay. Legend has it that the name "Murder Point" comes from a deadly dispute over an oyster lease at this site back in 1929. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

7 Years After BP Oil Spill, Oyster Farming Takes Hold In South

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Courtesy of Wendy MacNaughton

An Illustrated Guide To Master The Elements Of Cooking — Without Recipes

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