Food History & Culture : The Salt Here's where culture and history intersect. Here's where you'll find food's back story and the role it is playing in shaping our present and future.
Fabio Consoli for NPR

Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A Way

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Miguel Clarinha has been managing the shop for nine years alongside his cousin, Penelope. He believes the secret to its success is keeping the bakery a family-owned business. Rebecca Rosman/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Rosman/NPR

Only 6 People In The World Know The Recipe For Portugal's Famous Tarts

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Spiegelman's Charcoal Ice Cream with Pomegranate Swirl and Chocolate Sourdough Breadcrumbs is an edible ode Persephone —whose decision to eat pomegranate seeds sealed her fate as queen of the underworld, according to Greek mythology. Hannah Spiegelman hide caption

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Hannah Spiegelman

Workers sort NECCO Wafers at the New England Confectionery Co. in Revere, Mass. The Ohio-based Spangler Candy Company made the winning bid for NECCO, which filed for bankruptcy in early April. Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hate crimes are on the rise in Poland. In response, a new YouTube video aspires to foster tolerance by having people from marginalized groups bake and sell bread to customers at a Warsaw bakery. Above, some of the loaves baked and handed out as part of the campaign. Each loaf is wrapped in a black ribbon with a photo and information about the person who baked it. Anna Bińczyk hide caption

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Anna Bińczyk

The bagels for sale at Skokie's New York Bagel & Bialy, which opened in the Illinois town in 1962, are as good as any you'd find in the Big Apple. In the post-World War II era, the town became a hub for Jewish Holocaust survivors, and synagogues sprouted alongside Jewish delis. Amanda Leigh Lichtenstein hide caption

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Amanda Leigh Lichtenstein

If you're Southern, the macaroni and cheese with collard greens may taste better to you than to someone from another culture. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glasshouse Images/Getty Images

Illustrations of how the A.G.S. system portioned and cooked food, featured in the May 1969 issue of Cornell Hospital & Restaurant Administration Quarterly magazine. Col. Ambrose McGuckian, the author's step-grandfather, wrote in the magazine about the "water bath cooking" technique he'd developed — which sounds an awful lot like what we now know as sous vide. hide caption

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Irn Bru is known as Scotland's "other national drink." But the beloved bright orange soft drink is a sugar bomb, so its makers have reformulated it to comply with a new U.K. sugar tax. Andrew Milligan /PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Milligan /PA Images via Getty Images

Och, No! Some Scots Cry As Their Beloved Soda Gets A Less Sugary Revamp

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From left: Aladdin Sane, Thin White Duke, Ziggy Stardust, Major Tom, The Man Who Fell to Earth, and Halloween Jack are Bowie-inspired cocktails made by BKW by Brooklyn Winery. Shelby Hearn/BKW by Brooklyn Winery hide caption

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Shelby Hearn/BKW by Brooklyn Winery

Motal cheese is a fresh goat's milk cheese made primarily in remote mountain areas in Armenia. Cross of Armenian Unity/Ruslan Torosyan hide caption

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Cross of Armenian Unity/Ruslan Torosyan

Some of the jams and preserves made by the "Women's Solidarity Kitchen" in Istanbul, on display in their commercial kitchen. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon/NPR

Refugee Women Cook Up Syrian Cuisine To Eke Out A Living In Turkey

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Like other spring holidays, Sere Sal, the Yazidi new year, is about fertility and new life. An ancient Kurdish religious minority, the Yazidis color eggs for the holiday in honor of the colors that Tawus Melek, God's chief angel, is said to have spread throughout the new world. Nawaf Ashur hide caption

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Nawaf Ashur

Rumors of the NECCO maker's impending demise have sparked a renewed interest in its products — especially its famous chalky-tasting wafers that some people love to hate. Dina Rudick/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Dina Rudick/Boston Globe via Getty Images

NECCO-Mania: Fans Stock Up On Chalky Wafers In Case Candy Company Folds

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Sweet Potato Pie served at the Sweet Home Cafe inside the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. When the museum opened in October 2016, the pie contained a twist, ginger. But customers used to more traditional Southern African-American preparations of the dish weren't having it. It just shows how tricky "authentic" food can be. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images