Food History & Culture : The Salt Here's where culture and history intersect. Here's where you'll find food's back story and the role it is playing in shaping our present and future.

Carla Hall has a new book that explores her heritage and attempts to bring soul food to a wider audience. She embarked on a long journey through the South to investigate and get inspiration, and the story is a deep look into her philosophy. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

In Soul Food Cookbook, Chef Carla Hall Celebrates Black Culinary Heritage

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Vancouver activist and community food developer Ian Marcuse rides a bike outfitted like a spawning salmon created by artist Tamara Unroe. Murray Bush/Wild Salmon Caravan 2018 hide caption

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Murray Bush/Wild Salmon Caravan 2018

Harvey Washington Wiley was instrumental in bringing about regulations to boost sanitation and decrease food adulteration. Historical/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Historical/Corbis via Getty Images

How A 19th Century Chemist Took On The Food Industry With A Grisly Experiment

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Ancient Maya ruins at Tikal in northern Guatemala, near the border with Belize. Researcher Heather McKillop explains that Maya sites like Tikal could have been popular marketplaces to trade salt and other commodities. David DUCOIN/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images hide caption

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David DUCOIN/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images

Dairy farmer Dominique Rochat says the Swiss government's water deliveries have allowed him to keep his cows in the high mountains. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

High And Dry: Swiss Army Airlifts Water To Cows In Drought-Stricken Mountains

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Jamila Aamer is the head chef at the Amal Women's Training Center. To date, she's trained more than 100 students. Rebecca Rosman/for NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Rosman/for NPR

By Becoming Chefs, Stigmatized Women In Morocco Find Hope And Freedom

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Fresh Fest co-founders Day Bracey (left) and Mike Potter (right) visit with Chris Harris, owner of Black Frog Brewery in Holland, Ohio, near Toledo. Jeff Zoet/Courtesy Day Bracey hide caption

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Jeff Zoet/Courtesy Day Bracey

Louisiana crawfish caught in waters in and around Berlin are on display at Fisch Frank fish restaurant in Berlin. They are an invasive species and authorities recently licensed a local fisherman to catch them and sell them to local restaurants. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

For Berlin, Invasive Crustaceans Are A Tough Catch And A Tough Sell

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Starbucks is opening its first deaf-friendly store in the U.S., where employees will be versed in American Sign Language and stores will be designed to better serve deaf people. Courtesy of Starbucks hide caption

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Courtesy of Starbucks

Pesto and pulled jackfruit tacos. In Southern California, working-class Mexican-American chefs are giving traditionally meaty dishes a vegan spin. Evi Oravecz/Green Evi/Picture Press/Getty Images hide caption

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Evi Oravecz/Green Evi/Picture Press/Getty Images

Brian Kleinsasser, left, who works in the hog barn at Cool Spring Colony, helps Jake Waldner set up the Hutterite table during a Long Table dinner event at The Resort at Paws Up. Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up hide caption

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Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up

Tourists eat fried insects, including locusts, bamboo worms, dragonfly larvae, silkworm chrysalises and more during a competition in Lijiang, China. For Westerners, eating insects means getting over the ick factor. VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/Getty Images

Cristina Reyes Clark is part of an emerging movement in El Salvador that is composed of young chefs integrating traditional foods into contemporary cuisine. Massimo Ceresol hide caption

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Massimo Ceresol

The Princess Theatre in Lexington, Tenn., has been a staple in the community for a century. For many residents, it holds a special place in their memories. Megan Harris hide caption

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Megan Harris

A 50-Year-Old Popcorn Machine Feeds Nostalgia At The Movies

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A growing number of Muslim food bloggers and dietitians are trying to address the shifting needs of busy Muslims who want to eat healthy, nutritious meals when breaking fast. Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images
Fabio Consoli for NPR

Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A Way

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Miguel Clarinha has been managing the shop for nine years alongside his cousin, Penelope. He believes the secret to its success is keeping the bakery a family-owned business. Rebecca Rosman/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Rosman/NPR

Only 6 People In The World Know The Recipe For Portugal's Famous Tarts

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