Food History & Culture : The Salt Here's where culture and history intersect. Here's where you'll find food's back story and the role it is playing in shaping our present and future.
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The Salt

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Food History & Culture

At Colonial Williamsburg's garden and nursery, which is open to guests, staff grow items that would have been found in gentry pleasure gardens: herbs, flowers and seasonal greens. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation hide caption

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Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Bassam Ghraoui, who ran Syria's most famous chocolate factory, left for Hungary when war consumed his home country. He successfully rebuilt his business in Budapest. The company still uses ingredients from Syria. Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

A Syrian Chocolatier's Legend Lives On In Europe — But Stays Close To Its Roots

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The key to making the quintessential biscuit of the American South, like these from Callie's Charleston Biscuits Bakery in Charleston, S.C., is more about technique than a specific flour, some bakers say. Brett Flashnick/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Flashnick/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Sriraja Panich is the brand name of one of two Sriracha sauces created by Saowanit Trikityanukul's family. The family sold the brand to Thaitheparos, Thailand's leading sauce company, in the 1980s. The brand has struggled to gain a foothold in the U.S., where the Huy Fong Rooster brand of Sriracha, created by Vietnamese-American David Tran, reigns supreme. Michael Sullivan/for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/for NPR

In Home Of Original Sriracha Sauce, Thais Say Rooster Brand Is Nothing To Crow About

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Beloved in eastern Asia, especially Japan, persimmons get little respect in the United States, where many tree owners don't bother harvesting their crop. Alastair Bland/for NPR hide caption

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Alastair Bland/for NPR

This granary weevil has set up shop inside a kernel. Even without wings, these stealthy stowaways — with the help of humans — have managed to infest grains all over the world for thousands of years. Biophoto Associates/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Biophoto Associates/Getty Images/Science Source

Artist Stephanie Shih remembers making pork-filled dumplings with her family and started her art project by sculpting six of them out of porcelain. She's now made 600. Courtesy of Robert Bredvad hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert Bredvad

Nepal native Indra Sunuwar's vegetarian chow mein is a favorite order of regular customers to the café. Sunuwar arrived in Memphis with her family as a child refugee. Global Café hide caption

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Global Café

This is the original Old Taylor Distilling Co. castle in 2016. At the time, the property was still under renovation. Ashlie Stevens/WFPL hide caption

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Ashlie Stevens/WFPL

There is a whole subset of people who can't imagine popcorn without a sprinkling of nutritional yeast, which is naturally full of B vitamins that are harder to come by in meat-free diets. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Sorrel, a festive drink made by steeping hibiscus flowers, is the taste of the holidays throughout the Caribbean. It is also a close cousin to the African-American red drink, described as "liquid soul." Andrea Y. Henderson/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Y. Henderson/NPR

Michael Durand (left), husband of Kitchn Editor-In-Chief Faith Durand, and friend Chris Gardner (right) carve turkey while guests hang out in the Durands' kitchen, dirty dishes and all, at a recent party. Kitchn/Rachel Joy Barehl hide caption

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Kitchn/Rachel Joy Barehl

Like Moths To A Flame: Why Modern-Day Guests Always Gather In The Kitchen

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Rosogolla, also known as rasgulla, is a simple white spongy ball, made of chhena, an Indian version of cottage cheese, dunked in syrup. Above, newer, colorful iterations of this classic sweet are for sale during Rosogolla Day in Kolkata, India. Sandip Roy for NPR hide caption

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Sandip Roy for NPR

Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev (left) and former U.S. President George H.W. Bush share a light moment together outside the White House in 1990. Could they be discussing chicken? Ron Sachs/ Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Sachs/ Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images

Chicken Diplomacy: How President Bush Went For The Gut In The Former USSR

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The cover of a 1933 cookbook, Crisco Recipes For The Jewish Housewife, produced by Crisco's parent company Procter & Gamble, to promote the vegetable-based oil to the new wave of Jewish immigrants. from The New York Public Library (public domain) hide caption

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from The New York Public Library (public domain)

How A Corporation Convinced American Jews To Reach For Crisco

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A stingless Mayan bee (Melipona beecheii) gorges itself with honey during the harvest in Yucatan, Mexico. Eric Tou/Visuals Unlimited via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Tou/Visuals Unlimited via Getty Images

Leah Penniman made it her goal to start a farm for her neighbors, and to provide fresh food to refugees, immigrants and people affected by mass incarceration. Jamel Mosely/NPR hide caption

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Jamel Mosely/NPR

Carla Hall has a new book that explores her heritage and attempts to bring soul food to a wider audience. She embarked on a long journey through the South to investigate and get inspiration, and the story is a deep look into her philosophy. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

In Soul Food Cookbook, Chef Carla Hall Celebrates Black Culinary Heritage

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