Food History & Culture : The Salt Here's where culture and history intersect. Here's where you'll find food's back story and the role it is playing in shaping our present and future.

Food History & Culture

Methuselah, the first date palm tree grown from ancient seeds, in a photo taken in 2008. Guy Eisner hide caption

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Guy Eisner

Dates Like Jesus Ate? Scientists Revive Ancient Trees From 2,000-Year-Old Seeds

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Genie Milgrom, pictured in 2013, stands in the entryway of her Miami home wrapped in a long family tree, filled with the names of 22 generations of grandmothers. Raised Catholic, Milgrom traced her family's hidden Jewish roots with the help of a trove of ancient family recipes written down by the women of her family over generations. Emily Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Trove Of Recipes Dating Back To Inquisition Reveals A Family's Secret Jewish Roots

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The 20-foot-tall bronze sculpture of a boat loaded with refugees and migrants is the work of Canadian sculptor Timothy Schmalz. Its bread-and-fruit motif encapsulates how food is interlocked with the history of human migration. Grzegorz Galazka/Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images hide caption

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Grzegorz Galazka/Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images

At La Palma Calle Ocho in Miami, the churros are pulled hot from a fryer, placed into brown paper bags and drenched in granulated sugar. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

When Miami Temps Plunge Below 60, It's Time For Hot Churros

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A flock of Texel-Dorset sheep gather near a hay trough in a Hudson River Valley barn in Medusa, N.Y. Millennials and more experimental diners might be open to eating mutton. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

Nattapong Kaweeantawong, a third-generation owner of Wattana Panich, stirs the soup while his mother (left) helps serve and his wife (center) does other jobs at the restaurant. Nattapong or another family member must constantly stir the thick brew. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Soup's On! And On! Thai Beef Noodle Brew Has Been Simmering For 45 Years

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Ann Kim, owner of Hello Pizza in Edina, Minn., holds a Sicilian pan pie and a Hello Rita pizza. "Women can make progress in pizza that is harder in the macho restaurant world," Kim says. Bruce Bisping/Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bisping/Star Tribune via Getty Images

Kamel Guemari is a manager of a McDonald's in a neighborhood in Marseille, France, that's known for crime and drug gangs. He has been leading an employee charge to save the restaurant, which has become a vital community anchor in an under-resourced immigrant neighborhood. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Save The .... McDonald's? One Franchise In France Has Become A Social Justice Cause

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A vineyard in Tarija, Bolivia, the center of the country's wine industry. A growing number of wineries here are improving their techniques, ramping up production and starting to export, as global interest in Bolivia's award-winning wines grows. Insights/Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

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Insights/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Grown At High Altitudes, Bolivia's Wines Are Rising Stars

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A Swedish government program called the Edible Country recruited Michelin-starred chefs to create recipes that use ingredients that can be foraged from the areas around 13 picnic tables scattered across the countryside. Diners book a table, show up and hunt for their own food. Tina Stafrén/Visit Sweden hide caption

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Tina Stafrén/Visit Sweden

An engraving dating from the 19th century depicts passenger pigeons, once one of the most common birds in North America but now extinct because of overhunting and deforestation. Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty

Illustration from a 19th-century edition of Robinson Crusoe, a novel by Daniel Defoe first published in 1719. It relates the story of Robinson Crusoe, stranded on an island for 28 years and his subsequent fight for survival. Out of desperation, he became a master of innovation, especially at preparing meals. Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Hector Osorno is the Kraft Heinz Ketchup Master, whose job it is to make sure around 70% of the ketchup sold in America tastes the way it should. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Meet The Man Who Guards America's Ketchup

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Jasmine Cho's cookie portrait of Afong Moy, who is often cited as the first Chinese woman to step foot in the United States. Beginning in the 1830s, Moy was put on display before crowds as a curiosity. Jasmine Cho hide caption

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Jasmine Cho

This toad-shaped sandwich bar called the Toed In, near Los Angeles in 1939, allowed you to grab a bite to eat while your car got serviced. There's a lot of wordplay going on here: the toad-shaped building, the "towing in" of the car, and the stepping or "toeing" in for a snack. Good job, punsters! Ullstein Bild/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Ullstein Bild/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images