Producers : The Salt Stories about the people and things that help put food on our tables. From small farmers to big manufacturers, Wall Street advertising strategies to one-of-a-kind restaurants and changing growing practices, you'll find it here.
The Salt

The Salt

What's On Your Plate

Producers

Cocoa producers of the Yakasse-Attobrou Agricultural Cooperative gather cocoa pods in a certified Fair Trade-label cocoa plantation in Adzope, Ivory Coast. Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images

From left: Gloria Amaya, José Amaya, Silvia Gómez, and Alicia Villanueva, the founder of Tamales Los Mayas. A graduate of La Cocina's program for food entrepreneurs, Villanueva now provides catering to scores of Bay Area companies each month, and her tamales are sold in Northern California Whole Foods stores. Eric Wolfinger hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Wolfinger

The Food Business Incubator That Helps Immigrant Women Pursue The American Dream

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/730620774/733209433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Charles Brain helps hand harvest grapes in a Shiraz vineyard in the Swartland wine region of South Africa. Lubanzi Wines, which was started by Brain and his partner, Walker Brown, earned its B Corp certification this year. Christopher Grava/Courtesy of Lubanzi Wines hide caption

toggle caption
Christopher Grava/Courtesy of Lubanzi Wines

A worker dumps a bucket of tomatoes into a trailer at DiMare Farms in Florida City, Fla., in 2013. The Trump administration is preparing to level a new tariff on fresh tomatoes imported from Mexico in response to complaints from Florida growers. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Food Fight: Trump Administration Levels Tariffs On Mexican Tomatoes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721172201/721172224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman shopping in the 1970s picks up a bag of Snyder's pretzels. Today, Hanover remains a center of snack food manufacturing, even as the food industry changes around it. Courtesy of Snyder's of Hanover hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Snyder's of Hanover

Many backyard chicken keepers are thinking less about the business of raising chickens and more about collecting them — you just have to have them all — which comes with predictable consequences: too many eggs. Maarigard/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley Collection hide caption

toggle caption
Maarigard/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley Collection

After starting a brewery in Seoul, Booth Brewery co-founders Heeyoon Kim (left) and Sunghoo Yang moved their operations to California to make Korean beer and ship it back. Courtesy of The Booth Brewing Co. hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of The Booth Brewing Co.

Bob Moore, founder of Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods, inspects grains at the company's facility in Milwaukie, Ore. The pioneering manufacturer of gluten-free products invests in whole grains as well as beans, seeds, nuts, dried fruits, spices and herbs. Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Nationwide, there are too few farmers to populate market stalls and too few customers filling their canvas bags with fresh produce at each market. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Members of the Oregon Solidarity project include (from left) Ed King and Justin King of King Estate Winery; Christine Clair and Joe Ibrahim of Willamette Valley Vineyards, and Brent Stone and Ray Nuclo, also of King Estate Winery. Carolyn Wells Kramer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Wells Kramer for NPR

Bret Adee, a third-generation beekeeper who owns one of the largest beekeeping companies in the U.S., lost half of his hives — about 50,000 — over the winter. He pops the lid on one of the hives to show off the colony inside. Greta Mart/KCBX hide caption

toggle caption
Greta Mart/KCBX

Massive Loss Of Thousands Of Hives Afflicts Orchard Growers And Beekeepers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/694301239/695756036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brent Henderson harvests soybeans on his farm near Weona, Ark., in 2017. That crop showed symptoms of dicamba exposure. Henderson switched to Xtend soybeans the following year, he says, as "insurance" against future damage. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Charles/NPR

Is Fear Driving Sales Of Monsanto's Dicamba-Proof Soybeans?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691979417/692259167" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Apsara Bharati is watching over her field in Nepal, where she and her neighbors are using the system of rice intensification to plant seedlings. Danielle Preiss/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Danielle Preiss/NPR

Nepalese Rice Farmers Boost Yields By Sowing Fewer Plants And Cutting Water

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/689685891/689727893" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

California home cooks like Akshay Prabhu are excited about the prospect of selling food from their kitchens to supplement their incomes. Ezra David Romero/Capital Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Ezra David Romero/Capital Public Radio

Costco Wholesale requires its food suppliers to undergo annual inspections and requires some produce suppliers to hold shipments until tests come back negative for disease-causing bacteria. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Don't Panic: The Government Shutdown Isn't Making Food Unsafe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/684589220/684748540" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At the restaurant Siren by Robert Wiedmaier, pastry chef Maddy Morrissey uses marigold as the base for a Japanese dessert served with nasturtium leaves, flower petals and pineapple sage shortbread. Brian McBride/RWRestaurant Group hide caption

toggle caption
Brian McBride/RWRestaurant Group

Every summer, downy mildew spreads from Florida northward, adapting to nearly every defense pickle growers have in their arsenals and destroying their crops. Bernd Settnik/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bernd Settnik/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

At Odell Brewing Company in Fort Collins, Colo., Scott Dorsch pulls down a box of hops from the Yakima Valley in Washington, the state that grows the most hops in the nation. "We would buy more hops than what Colorado could produce," he says. Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media

Hundreds of public housing residents are becoming food entrepreneurs thanks to Food Business Pathways, a free 10-week program that offers food-loving New York City Housing Authority residents customized business training and resources. New York City Housing Authority hide caption

toggle caption
New York City Housing Authority

Different apples need different controlled storage environments. For example, Honeycrisps are sensitive to low temperatures so you can't put them in cold environments right after they've been harvested. And Fujis can't take high carbon dioxide levels. Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images/Westend61