Producers : The Salt Stories about the people and things that help put food on our tables. From small farmers to big manufacturers, Wall Street advertising strategies to one-of-a-kind restaurants and changing growing practices, you'll find it here.

Worldwide there are more than 30 million people living with HIV/AIDs. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

How One Pop-Up Restaurant Is Fighting Stigma Against HIV/AIDS

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A sign advertising a water sale sits on a farm outside Del Norte, Colorado. Luke Runyon/KUNC hide caption

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Luke Runyon/KUNC

To Save Their Water Supply, Colorado Farmers Taxed Themselves

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Fish market workers in Jersey City, N.J., prepare a bluefin tuna for shipment to some of New York's top sushi restaurants. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Organic farmers who grow their crops in soil participate in a protest in Stowe, Vt., in 2015. Critics say the organic label is at essence about the health of soil, and did not want to allow crops raised in hydroponic systems to be labeled organic. Their efforts to strip hydroponic vegetables of the organic label failed this week. Wilson Ring/AP Images hide caption

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Wilson Ring/AP Images

Hydroponic Veggies Are Taking Over Organic, And A Move To Ban Them Fails

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The Mexican long-tongued bat is one of the species that pollinates agave, but its ecosystem is being disrupted by large-scale, cheaper methods of making tequila. Merlin Tuttle/Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation hide caption

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Merlin Tuttle/Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation

Bats And Tequila: A Once Boo-tiful Relationship Cursed By Growing Demands

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Bob Scott, a weed scientist at the University of Arkansas, says he wishes more testing could have been done on the new dicamba formulations, but "the product was not made available to us." Dan Charles/ NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/ NPR

Monsanto Attacks Scientists After Studies Show Trouble For Weedkiller Dicamba

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Scientists have used a new gene-editing technique to create pigs that can keep their bodies warmer, burning more fat to produce leaner meat. Infrared pictures of 6-month-old pigs taken at zero, two, and four hours after cold exposure show that the pigs' thermoregulation was improved after insertion of the new gene. The modified pigs are on the right side of the images. Zheng et al. / PNAS hide caption

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Zheng et al. / PNAS

CRISPR Bacon: Chinese Scientists Create Genetically Modified Low-Fat Pigs

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Migrant Justice activists gather to celebrate the signing of an agreement with Ben & Jerry's that took two years to negotiate. Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio

A worker milking cows at a farm in Manati, Puerto Rico, on Thursday. Puerto Rico's dairy farmers account for about a third of the island's total agricultural production. Now they're struggling to recover their cows and get them milked. Courtesy of Manuel Perez hide caption

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Courtesy of Manuel Perez

Puerto Rico's Dairy Industry, Once Robust, Flattened By Maria

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As in the rest of the country, growers in heavily agricultural northern Michigan rely overwhelmingly on migrant laborers to work the fields and orchards. Most of the pickers are from Mexico. Growers say it's just about impossible to find Americans to do this work. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR

'They're Scared': Immigration Fears Exacerbate Migrant Farmworker Shortage

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Entrepreneurs sort cocoa beans on a tray at Cacao de Origen, a school founded by Maria Di Giacobbe to train Venezuelan women in the making of premium chocolate. Zeina Alvarado (left) later found work in a bean-to-bar production facility in Mexico. Courtesy of Cacao de Origen hide caption

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Courtesy of Cacao de Origen

Confusion over "sell by" and "use by" dates is one big reason why billions of tons of food are tossed each year. A new global initiative of food giants, including Amazon, Walmart and Nestle, aims to tackle that. mrtom-uk//iStockphoto hide caption

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mrtom-uk//iStockphoto

The organic industry is suing the government, demanding that the U.S. Department of Agriculture implement new rules that require organic egg producers to give their chickens more space to roam. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Organic Industry Sues USDA To Push For Animal Welfare Rules

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Guilvinec port Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Brexit Leaves French Fishermen On The Hook

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In the 1950s, the poultry industry began dunking birds in antibiotic baths. It was supposed to keep meat fresher and healthier. That's not what happened, as Maryn McKenna recounts in her new book. Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Express/Getty Images

Rice farmer John Gaulding wades through the roughly 8 inches of water still filling his fields in rural Hamshire, Texas. At its worst, he says, the water was as high as 30-36 inches. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Texas Farmers Suffer Extensive Crop Losses In Wake Of Harvey

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Tuna are arranged prior to the first auction of the year at Tsukiji Fish Market in Tokyo, Japan. The new agreement to protect Pacific bluefin tuna is aimed at putting the species on a path to recovery by setting sliding catch limits. The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images

Washington has eight Atlantic salmon net pens. There are two types: commercial net pens for raising Atlantic salmon and enhancement net pens for wild salmon that will eventually be released. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

The destructive diamondback moth has spread across the world and mutated to become immune to each new chemical pesticide designed to slay it. Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images