Producers : The Salt Stories about the people and things that help put food on our tables. From small farmers to big manufacturers, Wall Street advertising strategies to one-of-a-kind restaurants and changing growing practices, you'll find it here.

Oyster farmer and scientist Lisa Calvo leads a team of women that harvests oysters along the New Jersey coast. Calvo says she is inspired by the tenacity, skill and grit of women now coming into the industry. Jenn Hall/NPR hide caption

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Jenn Hall/NPR

The biggest fingerling salmon in this Alaskan fish hatchery are likely born to the biggest mothers. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

The Bigger The Mother Fish, The More Babies She Has

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A man shops for vegetables near romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in California, where the first death from the E. coli outbreak was reported. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Elation is an Angus bull that recently sold for $800,000. His co-owner, Brian Bell, sells Elation's semen for $50 a sample, about double the going rate. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Brad Felger, founder and CEO of Airstrike Bird Control, has had a self-described love for everything with feathers, scales or tails since he was 12 years old. Esmy Jimenez/NWPB hide caption

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Esmy Jimenez/NWPB

Arkansas farmer David Wildy inspects a field of soybeans that were damaged by dicamba. The pesticide ban is tied up in courts, leaving farmers uncertain about what to plant. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Casey Collins, Duke University energy manager, inspects a boiler at the West Campus Steam Plant. Soon, these boilers will run on swine biogas instead of natural gas. James Morrison/WUNC hide caption

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James Morrison/WUNC

Bottles of single barrel bourbon are filled on the bottling line at a distillery in Kentucky, the center of the bourbon universe. But some distillers are looking to other spirits, too. Luke Sharrett/Getty Images/Bloomberg Creative hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Getty Images/Bloomberg Creative

Deb Gangwish inspects soil on her farm near Shelton, Neb. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

A Grass-Roots Movement For Healthy Soil Spreads Among Farmers

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A cow at Carol and Bill Schuler's dairy farm in southwest Michigan. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

When Robots Milk Cows, Farm Families Taste Freedom

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Cuts of halal lamb shoulder sit on a shelf at the Superior Farms plant in Denver, waiting to be sold to small specialty stores that cater to Muslim consumers. Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media

Some beer makers are excited about the possibility of using modified yeast to flavor beer instead of hops, which require a lot of water to grow. Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF hide caption

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Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF

New Chinese tariffs will raise the price of many American crops, including almonds and other nuts. PM Images/Getty Images hide caption

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PM Images/Getty Images

What Chinese Tariffs Targeting American Crops Will Mean For Farmers

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Mexicali Resiste members chat outside their encampment in front of Baja California's government offices in Mexicali. From left to right, Alberto Salcido, Francisco Javier Trujillo, Mauricio Villa, Jesus Galaz Duarte and Jorge Benitez. Alex Zaragoza hide caption

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Alex Zaragoza

Cameras and claws are the machine's version of human eyes and hands. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Robots Are Trying To Pick Strawberries. So Far, They're Not Very Good At It

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Jacob Katz, with California Trout, says growing bugs in rice fields could be part of the solution for boosting salmon populations in rivers statewide. Ezra David Romero/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Capital Public Radio