Producers : The Salt Stories about the people and things that help put food on our tables. From small farmers to big manufacturers, Wall Street advertising strategies to one-of-a-kind restaurants and changing growing practices, you'll find it here.

Sampath, 63, planted these oil palm trees on his farm in Tamil Nadu, India, 12 years ago, but has yet to turn a profit. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

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Sushmita Pathak/NPR

Amid Palm Oil Boycott, India Wants To Produce More Of It

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The champagne grape harvest in northeastern France, like this one near Mailly-Champagne, started early this year due to lack of rain. Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

Champagne Makers Bubble Over A Bumper Crop Caused By European Drought

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Manure lagoons on hog farms like this one in eastern North Carolina flooded after Hurricane Floyd swept through in 1999, creating environmental and health concerns for nearby rivers. Farmers are worried that the scenario will repeat after Hurricane Florence hits this week. John Althouse/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Althouse/AFP/Getty Images

Hog Farmers Scramble to Drain Waste Pools Ahead Of Hurricane Florence

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While many Americans only know one kind of pomegranate — the ruby red Wonderful — there are actually dozens of varieties with different flavor and heartiness profiles. Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside hide caption

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Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside

The harvest is bad for German farmers this year as the country has experienced the hottest summer on record and months without rainfall. Christian Ender/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ender/Getty Images

German Farmers Struck By Drought Fear Further Damage From Climate Change

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Workers in dust masks wash fresh red bell peppers in smoky conditions outside of Eltopia, Wash. Even with the masks, the smoke is still causing tight chests, itchy eyes and dry throats. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

As Wildfires Rage, Smoke Chokes Out Farmworkers And Delays Some Crops

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The Food and Drug Administration quickly identified romaine lettuce as the source of a months-long outbreak, but the foodborne illness investigation has been one of the agency's most complicated in years. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

What Sparked An E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce? Scientists Trace A Surprising Source

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The new Chick-fil-A meal kits, featuring chicken-based dishes, will be available for pick up at some Atlanta-area restaurants starting this week. Chick-fil-A hide caption

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Chick-fil-A

Chick-Fil-A Pecks Its Way Into The Meal Kit Game

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The vines at Pheasant Ridge Winery near Lubbock, Texas, were devastated by drift from the herbicide 2,4-D in 2016. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

West Texas Vineyards Blasted By Herbicide Drift From Nearby Cotton Fields

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Some of the cattle grazing on the Persson Ranch are tracked using blockchain technology, which may allow consumers to know where their meat comes from and more. Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio

Where's The Beef? Wyoming Ranchers Bet On Blockchain To Track It

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A female blue orchard bee forages for nectar and pollen on Phacelia tanacetifolia flowers, also known as blue or purple tansy. Blue orchard bees are solitary bees that help pollinate California's almond orchards. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

Will Lambek, left, interprets for Enrique Balcazar, a Migrant Justice activist who helped negotiate the fair labor and living standards agreement with Ben & Jerry's. John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio

This laser unit is one of six that repel thieving birds from the blueberry fields of Meduri Farms near Jefferson, Ore. Tom Banse/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Tom Banse/Northwest News Network

Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds

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The Feed the Future Tworore Inkoko, Twunguke project hosts a meeting in the Gataraga sector of Rwanda to recruit farmers to grow chickens. If the farmers commit to four days of training and pass a competency test, they are given a backyard coop worth about $625, as well as the means to obtain 100 day-old chicks, vaccines, feed and technical advice. Emily Urban/NPR hide caption

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Emily Urban/NPR

Along the back of this field of sugar snap peas, sunflowers and bachelor buttons at Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center is a buffer of maturing big-leaf maples and red-osier dogwoods. It's a combination of forest and thicket that the farm has left standing to help protect water quality in the river and aquifer. Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center hide caption

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Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center

Fisherman Darius Kasprzak searches for cod in the Gulf of Alaska. The cod population there is at its lowest level on record. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Feidt for NPR

Gulf Of Alaska Cod Are Disappearing. Blame 'The Blob'

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The way cows digest food takes a lot of energy and generates a lot of heat. This makes them lose their appetite and produce less milk. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

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Mose Buchele/KUT

As Milk Production Cools In Summer, Farmers Try To Help Cows Take The Heat

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Brian Kleinsasser, left, who works in the hog barn at Cool Spring Colony, helps Jake Waldner set up the Hutterite table during a Long Table dinner event at The Resort at Paws Up. Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up hide caption

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Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up

The alkali bee is slightly smaller than a honey bee, with opalescent stripes that shimmer between yellow, green, red and blue. Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Southeast Oregon rancher Rancher Wayne Evans says he'll make it through this short water year, but it could cost him as much as $100,000 in lost hay, lost weight on his calves and equipment for hauling water to his livestock. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

Deepening Drought In Western U.S. Costs Ranchers Money And Heartache

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Amir Peay recently opened a distillery in Lexington, Ky., at the site of the James E. Pepper distillery. About 10 percent of his revenues come from exports, and Peay worries that the European Union's tariffs will hurt his overseas business. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

Caught In Tariff War, U.S. Distillers Fear Losing Out On Global Whiskey Boom

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