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The Salt

The Salt

What's On Your Plate

Producers

California home cooks like Akshay Prabhu are excited about the prospect of selling food from their kitchens to supplement their incomes. Ezra David Romero/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Capital Public Radio

Costco Wholesale requires its food suppliers to undergo annual inspections and requires some produce suppliers to hold shipments until tests come back negative for disease-causing bacteria. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Don't Panic: The Government Shutdown Isn't Making Food Unsafe

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At the restaurant Siren by Robert Wiedmaier, pastry chef Maddy Morrissey uses marigold as the base for a Japanese dessert served with nasturtium leaves, flower petals and pineapple sage shortbread. Brian McBride/RWRestaurant Group hide caption

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Brian McBride/RWRestaurant Group

Every summer, downy mildew spreads from Florida northward, adapting to nearly every defense pickle growers have in their arsenals and destroying their crops. Bernd Settnik/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Bernd Settnik/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

At Odell Brewing Company in Fort Collins, Colo., Scott Dorsch pulls down a box of hops from the Yakima Valley in Washington, the state that grows the most hops in the nation. "We would buy more hops than what Colorado could produce," he says. Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media

Hundreds of public housing residents are becoming food entrepreneurs thanks to Food Business Pathways, a free 10-week program that offers food-loving New York City Housing Authority residents customized business training and resources. New York City Housing Authority hide caption

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New York City Housing Authority

Different apples need different controlled storage environments. For example, Honeycrisps are sensitive to low temperatures so you can't put them in cold environments right after they've been harvested. And Fujis can't take high carbon dioxide levels. Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Getty Images/Westend61

Swordfish like this one, sunning itself off the coast of Ventura, Calif. have traditionally been caught in drift gillnets. But ocean activists say the method is unsustainable because it captures too many other sea creatures. Douglas Klug/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Klug/Getty Images

Josh Davis tends to his hog herd on his farm in Pocahontas, Ill. Once a popular breed, there are now only a few hundred American mulefoot hogs left. David Kovaluk/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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David Kovaluk/St. Louis Public Radio

The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sam Richman, owner-chef of Sammy's Deluxe restaurant in Rockland, says his patrons tend to prefer full-grown unagi smoked, European style, rather than as Japanese sushi. Keith Shortall/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Keith Shortall/Maine Public Radio

Sampath, 63, planted these oil palm trees on his farm in Tamil Nadu, India, 12 years ago, but has yet to turn a profit. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

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Sushmita Pathak/NPR

Amid Palm Oil Boycott, India Wants To Produce More Of It

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The champagne grape harvest in northeastern France, like this one near Mailly-Champagne, started early this year due to lack of rain. Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

Champagne Makers Bubble Over A Bumper Crop Caused By European Drought

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Manure lagoons on hog farms like this one in eastern North Carolina flooded after Hurricane Floyd swept through in 1999, creating environmental and health concerns for nearby rivers. Farmers are worried that the scenario will repeat after Hurricane Florence hits this week. John Althouse/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Althouse/AFP/Getty Images

Hog Farmers Scramble to Drain Waste Pools Ahead Of Hurricane Florence

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While many Americans only know one kind of pomegranate — the ruby red Wonderful — there are actually dozens of varieties with different flavor and heartiness profiles. Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside hide caption

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Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside

The harvest is bad for German farmers this year as the country has experienced the hottest summer on record and months without rainfall. Christian Ender/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ender/Getty Images

German Farmers Struck By Drought Fear Further Damage From Climate Change

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Workers in dust masks wash fresh red bell peppers in smoky conditions outside of Eltopia, Wash. Even with the masks, the smoke is still causing tight chests, itchy eyes and dry throats. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

As Wildfires Rage, Smoke Chokes Out Farmworkers And Delays Some Crops

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The Food and Drug Administration quickly identified romaine lettuce as the source of a months-long outbreak, but the foodborne illness investigation has been one of the agency's most complicated in years. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

What Sparked An E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce? Scientists Trace A Surprising Source

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The new Chick-fil-A meal kits, featuring chicken-based dishes, will be available for pick up at some Atlanta-area restaurants starting this week. Chick-fil-A hide caption

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Chick-fil-A

Chick-Fil-A Pecks Its Way Into The Meal Kit Game

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