Producers : The Salt Stories about the people and things that help put food on our tables. From small farmers to big manufacturers, Wall Street advertising strategies to one-of-a-kind restaurants and changing growing practices, you'll find it here.

The Feed the Future Tworore Inkoko, Twunguke project hosts a meeting in the Gataraga sector of Rwanda to recruit farmers to grow chickens. If the farmers commit to four days of training and pass a competency test, they are given a backyard coop worth about $625, as well as the means to obtain 100 day-old chicks, vaccines, feed and technical advice. Emily Urban/NPR hide caption

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Emily Urban/NPR

Along the back of this field of sugar snap peas, sunflowers and bachelor buttons at Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center is a buffer of maturing big-leaf maples and red-osier dogwoods. It's a combination of forest and thicket that the farm has left standing to help protect water quality in the river and aquifer. Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center hide caption

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Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center

The way cows digest food takes a lot of energy and generates a lot of heat. This makes them lose their appetite and produce less milk. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

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Mose Buchele/KUT

As Milk Production Cools In Summer, Farmers Try To Help Cows Take The Heat

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Brian Kleinsasser, left, who works in the hog barn at Cool Spring Colony, helps Jake Waldner set up the Hutterite table during a Long Table dinner event at The Resort at Paws Up. Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up hide caption

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Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up

The alkali bee is slightly smaller than a honey bee, with opalescent stripes that shimmer between yellow, green, red and blue. Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Southeast Oregon rancher Rancher Wayne Evans says he'll make it through this short water year, but it could cost him as much as $100,000 in lost hay, lost weight on his calves and equipment for hauling water to his livestock. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

Deepening Drought In Western U.S. Costs Ranchers Money And Heartache

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Amir Peay recently opened a distillery in Lexington, Ky., at the site of the James E. Pepper distillery. About 10 percent of his revenues come from exports, and Peay worries that the European Union's tariffs will hurt his overseas business. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

Caught In Tariff War, U.S. Distillers Fear Losing Out On Global Whiskey Boom

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The booming real estate market has driven up prices to the point where Rhode Island now has the most expensive farmland in the country. The state is trying to preserve some land for farmers. Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images hide caption

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Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images

Rhode Island Bets The Farm That Cheap Land Will Help Local Agriculture Thrive

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Abner Stolztfus owns Cedar Dream dairy farm in Peach Bottom, Pa. Last year, Stolztfus decided to invest almost $200,000 in equipment and learned how to make yogurt from scratch. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

The steel used to build lobster traps like these, stacked up outside a fish market on Martha's Vineyard, is getting pricier, thanks to new tariffs. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Got Lobster? Trump's Steel Tariffs Threaten Trap Industry

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Doug Brown and his brother Roger, right, operate Slopeside Syrup in Richmond, Vt. They're challenging a proposed federal label that would say maple syrup has "added sugar." John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio

Frozen vegetables are displayed for sale at an Aldi supermarket in Hackensack, N.J. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Frozen Food Fan? As Sales Rise, Studies Show Frozen Produce Is As Healthy As Fresh

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Oyster farmer and scientist Lisa Calvo leads a team of women that harvests oysters along the New Jersey coast. Calvo says she is inspired by the tenacity, skill and grit of women now coming into the industry. Jenn Hall/NPR hide caption

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Jenn Hall/NPR

The biggest fingerling salmon in this Alaskan fish hatchery are likely born to the biggest mothers. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

The Bigger The Mother Fish, The More Babies She Has

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A man shops for vegetables near romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in California, where the first death from the E. coli outbreak was reported. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Elation is an Angus bull that recently sold for $800,000. His co-owner, Brian Bell, sells Elation's semen for $50 a sample, about double the going rate. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Brad Felger, founder and CEO of Airstrike Bird Control, has had a self-described love for everything with feathers, scales or tails since he was 12 years old. Esmy Jimenez/NWPB hide caption

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Esmy Jimenez/NWPB

Arkansas farmer David Wildy inspects a field of soybeans that were damaged by dicamba. The pesticide ban is tied up in courts, leaving farmers uncertain about what to plant. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR