Eating And Health : The Salt Here you'll find the key nutrition studies, the best reports on the mental and physical effects of food on the body and food safety news you need to know now.
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Eating And Health

LifeVine boasts that it has little sugar and higher antioxidant levels than most wines. There is a wave of wines and spirits that aim to woo wellness enthusiasts. But some health claims made by alcohol brands have scientists on edge. LifeVine Wines hide caption

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LifeVine Wines
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Mixing Alcohol And Sun? Beware, A Buzz Begets A Faster Burn

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These greens are among the hydroponic crops grown by students at Brownsville Collaborative Middle School, in Brooklyn, N.Y. In June, the students started to sell discounted boxes of the fresh produce to community members. Robin Lloyd/for NPR hide caption

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Robin Lloyd/for NPR

Athletic Brewing Co. co-founders Bill Shufelt (right) and John Walker, here at the company's production plant in Stratford, Conn., have created a range of high-quality nonalcoholic beers to provide people more options when they're out socializing. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Processed meats, including hot dogs and bacon, cook in a frying pan. A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those who cut back. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images
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Why Food Reformers Have Mixed Feelings About Eco-Labels

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A sign in the window of a New York City market advertises the acceptance of food stamps. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How A Fight Over Beef Jerky Reveals Tensions Over SNAP In The Trump Era

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An example of one of the study's ultra-processed lunches consists of quesadillas, refried beans and diet lemonade. Participants on this diet ate an average of 508 calories more per day and gained an average of 2 pounds over two weeks. Hall et al./Cell Metabolism hide caption

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Hall et al./Cell Metabolism

It's Not Just Salt, Sugar, Fat: Study Finds Ultra-Processed Foods Drive Weight Gain

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Companies are using new gene-editing tools to alter the DNA of food crops. One of these products is a soybean with a healthier kind of oil. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Will Gene-Edited Food Be Government Regulated?

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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Bob Moore, founder of Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods, inspects grains at the company's facility in Milwaukie, Ore. The pioneering manufacturer of gluten-free products invests in whole grains as well as beans, seeds, nuts, dried fruits, spices and herbs. Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A study found that consuming two eggs per day was linked to a 27 percent higher risk of developing heart disease. But many experts say this new finding is no justification to drop eggs from your diet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

How To Get Meat Eaters To Eat More Plant-Based Foods? Make Their Mouths Water

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Slow carbs like whole-grain breads and pastas, oats and brown rice are rich in fiber and take more time to digest, so they don't lead to the same quick rise in blood sugar that refined carbs can cause. fcafotodigital/Getty Images hide caption

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fcafotodigital/Getty Images

You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

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Coconut oil's potential health benefits are outweighed by its heavy dose of saturated fat, most nutrition experts say. Saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Is Coconut Oil All It's Cracked Up To Be? Get The Facts On This Faddish Fat

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There is a whole subset of people who can't imagine popcorn without a sprinkling of nutritional yeast, which is naturally full of B vitamins that are harder to come by in meat-free diets. Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas "Uptown T" Stewart (left), has been shucking oysters at Pascal's Manale restaurant for more than 30 years, about as long as Paula (middle) and Brent Coussou have been going there. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

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Travis Lux/WWNO

Unless you're an extreme athlete, recovering from an injury, or over 60, you probably need only 50 to 60 grams of protein a day. And you probably already get that in your food without adding pills, bars or powders. Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR hide caption

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Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?

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Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket in California in April, during an E. coli outbreak traced to contaminated lettuce. The CDC says a new outbreak has made lettuce dangerous to eat, just in time for America's most foodcentric holiday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The sweetened beverage industry has spent millions to combat soda taxes and support medical groups that avoid blaming sugary drinks for health problems. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images