Eating And Health : The Salt Here you'll find the key nutrition studies, the best reports on the mental and physical effects of food on the body and food safety news you need to know now.
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Eating And Health

Bob Moore, founder of Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods, inspects grains at the company's facility in Milwaukie, Ore. The pioneering manufacturer of gluten-free products invests in whole grains as well as beans, seeds, nuts, dried fruits, spices and herbs. Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A study found that consuming two eggs per day was linked to a 27 percent higher risk of developing heart disease. But many experts say this new finding is no justification to drop eggs from your diet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

How To Get Meat Eaters To Eat More Plant-Based Foods? Make Their Mouths Water

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Slow carbs like whole-grain breads and pastas, oats and brown rice are rich in fiber and take more time to digest, so they don't lead to the same quick rise in blood sugar that refined carbs can cause. fcafotodigital/Getty Images hide caption

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You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

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Coconut oil's potential health benefits are outweighed by its heavy dose of saturated fat, most nutrition experts say. Saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Is Coconut Oil All It's Cracked Up To Be? Get The Facts On This Faddish Fat

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There is a whole subset of people who can't imagine popcorn without a sprinkling of nutritional yeast, which is naturally full of B vitamins that are harder to come by in meat-free diets. Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas "Uptown T" Stewart (left), has been shucking oysters at Pascal's Manale restaurant for more than 30 years, about as long as Paula (middle) and Brent Coussou have been going there. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

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Travis Lux/WWNO

Unless you're an extreme athlete, recovering from an injury, or over 60, you probably need only 50 to 60 grams of protein a day. And you probably already get that in your food without adding pills, bars or powders. Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR hide caption

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Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?

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Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket in California in April, during an E. coli outbreak traced to contaminated lettuce. The CDC says a new outbreak has made lettuce dangerous to eat, just in time for America's most foodcentric holiday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The sweetened beverage industry has spent millions to combat soda taxes and support medical groups that avoid blaming sugary drinks for health problems. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images

Shoppers who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program may find it harder to use their benefits to purchase fresh fruit and vegetables at farmers markets like this one in Minneapolis, Minn., while the goverment changes contractors. Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Food assistance recipients spend about 10 percent of their food budget on sugary drinks, while the rest of the population spends about 7 percent. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Microplastics are not just showing up on beaches like this one in the Canary Islands — a very small study shows that they are in human waste in many parts of the world. Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images

Harvey Washington Wiley was instrumental in bringing about regulations to boost sanitation and decrease food adulteration. Historical/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Historical/Corbis via Getty Images

How A 19th Century Chemist Took On The Food Industry With A Grisly Experiment

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Fried chicken and mac and cheese: A study suggests Southern cuisine may be at the center of a tangled web of reasons why black people in America are more prone to hypertension than white people. Robert Manella/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Manella/Getty Images

Jaap Korteweg, here in The Vegetarian Butcher's new restaurant, De Vleesch Lobby, says recreating the texture of meat "requires the patience of a monk and the best experts to achieve the right result." Thessa Lageman/NPR hide caption

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Thessa Lageman/NPR

More kids are eating at fast-food chains like McDonald's, according to a new study, but parents are buying the healthier side options only about half the time. Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Yogurt selections like this one at a Los Angeles 365 by Whole Foods Market store are getting larger, but a new U.K. study warns that many contain lots of added sugar. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

If patients are obese, their physicians should refer them to behavior-based weight loss programs or offer their own, a national panel of experts says. Yet many doctors aren't having the necessary conversations with their patients. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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The Food and Drug Administration quickly identified romaine lettuce as the source of a months-long outbreak, but the foodborne illness investigation has been one of the agency's most complicated in years. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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What Sparked An E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce? Scientists Trace A Surprising Source

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A small new study shows that successful dieters had an abundance of a bacteria called Phascolarctobacterium, whereas another bacteria, Dialister, was associated with a failure to lose weight. sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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Diet Hit A Snag? Your Gut Bacteria May Be Partly To Blame

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