Eating And Health : The Salt Here you'll find the key nutrition studies, the best reports on the mental and physical effects of food on the body and food safety news you need to know now.
Fabio Consoli for NPR

Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A Way

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Doug Brown and his brother Roger, right, operate Slopeside Syrup in Richmond, Vt. They're challenging a proposed federal label that would say maple syrup has "added sugar." John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio

Scientists find that rice grown under elevated carbon conditions loses substantial amounts of protein, zinc, iron and B vitamins, depending on the variety. Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage hide caption

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Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage

Frozen vegetables are displayed for sale at an Aldi supermarket in Hackensack, N.J. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Frozen Food Fan? As Sales Rise, Studies Show Frozen Produce Is As Healthy As Fresh

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Swallowing disorders are becoming more common. Some chefs are now whipping up nutritious recipes that are not only easy on the throat, but help restore the joy of eating. Left: Pureed satay chicken with edamame, shaped into the form of a drumstick. Right: Pureed fruit and yogurt set with agar agar — Australian chef Peter Morgan-Jones calls it an ideal finger food for those with dysphagia. Matt Jewell/HammondCare hide caption

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Matt Jewell/HammondCare

A man shops for vegetables near romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in California, where the first death from the E. coli outbreak was reported. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Signs declare the calorie counts for sandwiches and other grab-and-go items at a Starbucks in Washington, D.C. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Now That Calorie Labels Are Federal Law, Will We Eat Less?

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A box of food prepared at a food bank distribution in Petaluma, Calif. The state ranks near the bottom in enrolling people for food assistance. To change that, it's taking lessons from its robust Medi-Cal health insurance program, which targets much the same population. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP
Paige Vickers for NPR

Probiotics For Babies And Kids? New Research Explores Good Bacteria

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Signs hung up in front of a vacant lot in Weeksville, Brooklyn, in 2014 by members of 596 Acres, an organization that maps vacant lots in New York City and advocates for community stewardship of th at land. Murray Spenser Cox hide caption

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Murray Spenser Cox

Irn Bru is known as Scotland's "other national drink." But the beloved bright orange soft drink is a sugar bomb, so its makers have reformulated it to comply with a new U.K. sugar tax. Andrew Milligan /PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Milligan /PA Images via Getty Images

Och, No! Some Scots Cry As Their Beloved Soda Gets A Less Sugary Revamp

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Carolina Reapers are some of the hottest peppers in the world. So hot, in fact, that for one man, participating in a pepper-eating contestant resulted in a painful, serious "thunderclap headache." Maria Dattola Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Dattola Photography/Getty Images

The Super-Hot Pepper That Sent A Man To The ER

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Soda for sale at a supermarket in the Port Richmond neighborhood of Philadelphia. A sticker on the shelves tells customers the items are subject to the city's sugar tax. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Carrageenan is an extract derived from seaweeds like these harvested off Hingutanan Island, Bien Unido, Bohol, Philippines. Farley Baricuatro/Getty Images hide caption

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Farley Baricuatro/Getty Images

Cutting back up to 25 percent of your calories per day helps slow your metabolism and reduce free radicals that cause cell damage and aging. But would you want to? VisualField/Getty Images hide caption

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VisualField/Getty Images

You May Live Longer By Severely Restricting Calories, Scientists Say

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DMG Foods, the Salvation Army's first supermarket, offers discount groceries to nutritional assistance beneficiaries and anyone else who walks through the door. dmgfoods.org hide caption

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dmgfoods.org

Salvation Army Opens Its First-Ever Supermarket, In Baltimore

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Iron pops up in everything from spinach to steaks. But it's not the same from every source – and how much you absorb depends in part on what you eat with it. Xsandra/Getty Images hide caption

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Xsandra/Getty Images

A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of the surface of the human tongue. Taste buds are shown in purple. Doctors have known that as people pack on the pounds, their sense of taste diminishes. New research in mice suggests one reason why: Inflammation brought on by obesity may be killing taste buds. Omikron Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Omikron Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source

Harnessing the power of wearable devices, data, education and a peer support group, people with prediabetes can lose weight and fend off the disease. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

This Chef Lost 50 Pounds And Reversed Prediabetes With A Digital Program

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A study in mice suggests that our brains tell us when to start and stop drinking long before our bodies are fully hydrated. Guido Mieth/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Mieth/Getty Images

Still Thirsty? It's Up To Your Brain, Not Your Body

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