Eating And Health : The Salt Here you'll find the key nutrition studies, the best reports on the mental and physical effects of food on the body and food safety news you need to know now.

Eating And Health

In her new book, neuroscientist Sandra Aamodt tackles why traditional diets don't work for many people, and often leave the dieter worse off than before. PM Images/Getty Images hide caption

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PM Images/Getty Images

A typical label includes safe cooking instructions. This label on blade-tenderized beef sold at Costco recommends 160 degrees as the minimum internal temperature, which doesn't require a three-minute rest time. Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR hide caption

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Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR

Coming soon: The redesigned nutrition facts label will highlight added sugars in food. The label also will display calories per serving, and serving size, more prominently. U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration

A 1950s poster from the National Dairy Council. Ads like these helped fuel the rise of cereal as a breakfast staple. David Pollack/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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David Pollack/Corbis via Getty Images

Breakfast Backtrack: Maybe Skipping The Morning Meal Isn't So Bad

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The maker of Kind bars — which contain almonds and other nuts — pushed back against an FDA complaint about its use of the phrase "healthy and tasty." The FDA is now reviewing its definition of "healthy" as used on food labels. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why The FDA Is Re-Evaluating The Nutty Definition Of 'Healthy' Food

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The earliest records of tiger nuts date back to ancient Egypt, where they were valuable and loved enough to be entombed and discovered with buried Egyptians as far back as the 4th millennium B.C. Now, tiger nuts are making a comeback in the health food aisle. Nutritionally, they do OK. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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Matailong Du/NPR

A child runs a shopping cart relay during an Education Department summer enrichment event, "Let's Read, Let's Move." The 2012 event was part of a summer initiative to engage youths in summer reading and physical activity, and provide them information about healthy, affordable food. Many efforts underway are aimed at getting people to think anew about their daily habits. Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images

It's not just kombucha and yogurt: Probiotics are now showing up in dozens of packaged foods. But what exactly do these designer foods with friendly flora actually offer — besides a high price tag? Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

There's a growing body of evidence challenging the notion that low-fat dairy is best. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

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