Food For Thought : The Salt There's never been more interest in food and where it comes from and how it gets to your plate. This is the place for science, politics and the controversial topics that make you go "hmm."

Food For Thought

Thursday

Methuselah, the first date palm tree grown from ancient seeds, in a photo taken in 2008. Guy Eisner hide caption

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Guy Eisner

Dates Like Jesus Ate? Scientists Revive Ancient Trees From 2,000-Year-Old Seeds

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Chopped and frozen samples of damaged soybean plants are kept in storage at the Office of the Indiana State Chemist. Many contain residues of the herbicide dicamba. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed By Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA For Help

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Tuesday

Chef Tunde Wey uses food as a tool for social justice. His company, BabyZoos, aims to use profits from the sale of applesauce to hospitals to fund ventures that create more economic opportunities for African Americans in an effort to close racial wealth — and health — gaps. L. Kasimu Harris for NPR hide caption

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L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Tuesday

The 20-foot-tall bronze sculpture of a boat loaded with refugees and migrants is the work of Canadian sculptor Timothy Schmalz. Its bread-and-fruit motif encapsulates how food is interlocked with the history of human migration. Grzegorz Galazka/Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images hide caption

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Grzegorz Galazka/Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images

Sunday

A sweet view along one of the many canals of Venice, which in this case are filled with blue jellybeans. Pradipta Banerjee/Courtesy of David M. Schwarz Architects hide caption

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Pradipta Banerjee/Courtesy of David M. Schwarz Architects

Candy Canals: Architects Craft Gingerbread Replica Of Venice

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Tuesday

Members of the Crop Wild Relatives project from the Crop Trust joined their research partners in Nepal on an expedition to collect wild relatives of rice, okra and eggplant in October 2017. Hannes Dempewolf of the Crop Trust says the elephants kept the researchers high enough off the ground that they didn't have to worry about any snakes that might be lurking. L.M. Salazar/Crop Trust hide caption

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L.M. Salazar/Crop Trust

Raiders Of The Lost Crops: Scientists Race Against Time To Save Genetic Diversity

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Saturday

Peter Melnik, a fourth-generation dairy farmer, owns Bar-Way Farm, Inc. in Deerfield, Mass. He has an anaerobic digester on his farm that converts food waste into renewable energy. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Chew On This: Farmers Are Using Food Waste To Make Electricity

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Tuesday

A flock of Texel-Dorset sheep gather near a hay trough in a Hudson River Valley barn in Medusa, N.Y. Millennials and more experimental diners might be open to eating mutton. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

Friday

Rose McAdoo makes cakes based on research performed by her colleagues at Antarctica's McMurdo Station research base. Courtesy of Rose McAdoo hide caption

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Courtesy of Rose McAdoo

Monday

Thursday

Justin Ruben of ParentsTogether speaks on Thursday at a press conference organized to deliver 1.5 million petitions to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The petitions are protesting proposed changes to the food stamps program that would also affect the free school lunch program. Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Parents Together hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Parents Together

Monday

Chef Angie Mar, who has received rave reviews for her New York chophouse Beatrice Inn, has been called a "badass" by the press. While some women have no problem with the word and use it in an entirely complimentary context, many others dislike its bro-culture connotation. Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images

Friday

Tuesday

A vineyard worker drives a grape harvester tractor in the Bordeaux region of southwestern France, where climate change is raising new challenges for winemakers. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Disrupting Centuries-Old Methods Of Winemaking In France

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Saturday

Lake Shinji, near Japan's coast, is known for its beauty. Until about a decade ago, the lake was also home to thriving fisheries. New research suggests runoff of the controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids, used on nearby rice paddies, may be responsible for declining fish populations. Gyro Photography/amanaimagesRF/Getty Images hide caption

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Gyro Photography/amanaimagesRF/Getty Images

Controversial Pesticides Are Suspected Of Starving Fish

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