Economy : The Two-Way In an age when currency crises in far flung parts of the world can cause layoffs at factories and offices in mid-America, it's important to keep up on news from the business world. The Two-Way monitors what's happening. We make sense of the trends.

A protester holds a European Union flag next to cardboard cutouts depicting Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, as Zuckerberg and leaders of the European Parliament prepare to meet in Brussels. Francois Lenoir/Reuters hide caption

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Francois Lenoir/Reuters

"The Internet wasn't broken in 2015," FCC Chairman Ajit Pai says, referring to the year when net neutrality rules were adopted. Pai is seen here speaking to the House Appropriations Committee earlier this year. Alex Edelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/Getty Images

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson faces a lawsuit over his agency's sidelining of a rule that is meant to prevent segregation in areas that receive federal housing funds. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (center left) and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (center right) walk through a hotel lobby as they head to a state guest house to meet Chinese officials in Beijing on Friday. The talks included a "thorough exchange of views," Chinese media report. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Trade Team Leaves China Talks Without Any Big Breakthroughs

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Ford will focus on SUVs and trucks — and eliminate many of its sedans — in the North American market. Here, the company's trucks were highlighted at the 2018 North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Trader Edward Curran (right) works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. As Treasury yields topped 3 percent on Tuesday, the Dow Jones industrial average tumbled. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is levying a $1 billion fine against Wells Fargo as punishment for the banking giant's actions in its mortgage and auto loan businesses. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Thomas Fire advanced toward Santa Barbara County on Dec. 10, 2017, in Carpinteria, Calif. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

As Climate Costs Grow, Some See A Moneymaking Opportunity

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According to reporting by CNBC, Cubeyou collected data from Facebook users through personality quizzes "for non-profit academic research" developed with Cambridge University, and then sold the data to advertisers. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

A shopper makes a purchase at the J.C. Penney store in North Riverside, Ill., Nov. 17. U.S. consumer spending grew in the fourth quarter at its fastest pace in three years. Kamil Krzaczynski/Reuters hide caption

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Kamil Krzaczynski/Reuters

Trader Fran O'Connell works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The Dow Jones industrial average rebounded sharply on Monday following a report of U.S.-China trade talks. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

The floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday. The Dow Jones industrial average tumbled after the Trump administration announced plans to impose tariffs on Chinese imports. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell testifies during a Senate banking committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on March 1. This week, Powell presided over a Fed policy meeting for the first time since becoming chairman. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Fed Raises Interest Rates Again As New Chairman Steps Into Spotlight

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