Must Reads : The Two-Way Some stories are just too weird, too funny or too sad to ignore. They may not be "serious news," but are so fascinating you must read them. NPR correspondents are on the watch for such tales. We pass along the best, from NPR and other news outlets.

A skull discovered at a sacred Aztec temple. A new study analyzed DNA extracted from the teeth of people who died in a 16th century epidemic that destroyed the Aztec empire, and found a type of salmonella may have caused the epidemic. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Waves crash onto the beach near Brighton Pier in England, in January 2007. Gale force winds and heavy rain brought disruption to large parts of the country. Severe weather events like this one may be linked to more frequent fluctuations in the polar jet stream, according to a new study. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

A modern moth with a proboscis, the organ adapted for sucking up fluids such as nectar. Newly discovered fossil evidence suggests ancestors of such animals exists before flowering plants, raising questions about what ancient butterflies and moths used their tongue-like appendages for. Hossein Rajaei/Science Advances hide caption

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Hossein Rajaei/Science Advances

'Butterfly Tongues' Are More Ancient Than Flowers, Fossil Study Finds

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Logan Paul, seen here last month, is being criticized for the way he handled a visit to Japan's Aokigahara forest, famous for its popularity among people who carry out suicide. Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

Two people swim at a beach in Vieques, Puerto Rico. One of the bays on the island is famous for its bioluminescent plankton, which are slowly recovering after Hurricane Maria. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo for NPR

After Maria, One Of The World's Best Bioluminescent Bays Slowly Begins To Glow Again

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Carving your initials in a tree in Washington, D.C.? Not illegal. Carving your initials in a sedated patient's transplanted liver? Criminal assault, according to U.K. courts. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

An illustration comparing the giant penguin to an average person. Kumimanu biceae weighed about 220 pounds and was a bit shorter than 6 feet in height. It swam around off the coast of New Zealand between 55 and 60 million years ago. Gerald Mayr hide caption

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Gerald Mayr

Giant Prehistoric Penguins Once Swam Off The Coast Of New Zealand

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An artist's illustration of 'Oumuamua, a cigar-shaped interstellar object discovered in October. Now, astronomers want to know if this interloper might harbor life. ESO/M. Kornmesser hide caption

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ESO/M. Kornmesser

Melt ponds dot a stretch of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, north of Greenland. This year was the Arctic's second-warmest in at least 1,500 years, after 2016. Nathan Kurtz/NASA hide caption

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Nathan Kurtz/NASA

Arctic's Temperature Continues To Run Hot, Latest 'Report Card' Shows

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A tick grasping a dinosaur feather is preserved in 99 million-year-old amber from Myanmar. Peñalver et al/Nature Communications hide caption

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Peñalver et al/Nature Communications

Amber-Trapped Tick Suggests Ancient Bloodsuckers Feasted On Feathered Dinosaurs

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Researchers found that when narwhals like these were released from a net, the animals' heart rates dropped even as they were swimming rapidly. Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Stressed-Out Narwhals Don't Know Whether To Freeze Or Flee, Scientists Find

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An artist's conception of the most-distant supermassive black hole ever discovered, which is part of a quasar from just 690 million years after the Big Bang. Robin Dienel/Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science/Nature hide caption

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Robin Dienel/Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science/Nature

A peregrine falcon in Germany. A new study finds the birds are able to dive at high speeds and catch moving prey using a mathematical principle that also guides missiles. Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images

The inoperable and unused scanner at Afghanistan's Islam Qara border crossing in March 2017. Special Inspector General For Afghanistan Reconstruction hide caption

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Special Inspector General For Afghanistan Reconstruction