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You might not recognize the names of the 2018 Whiting Award winners, but you probably recognize many of their predecessors — including Pulitzer winner Jorie Graham, National Book Award winner Jonathan Franzen, David Foster Wallace, NBA winners Denis Johnson and Adam Johnson, and Man Booker winner Lydia Davis. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Author Sue Grafton, author of 25 mysteries featuring detective Kinsey Millhone, died Thursday at age 77. Grafton is seen here with a copy of her book R is for Ricochet in 2005. Michael Buckner/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Buckner/Getty Images

Poet John Ashbery, seen here in his New York apartment in 2008, is widely regarded as one of the 20th century's greatest poets. He died at the age of 90 on Sunday, at his home in Hudson, N.Y. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Former President Barack Obama's tweet after the violence Charlottesville, Va., is now the most-liked tweet ever. The tweet quoted Nelson Mandela and included this photo of Obama visiting a daycare in Maryland. Pete Souza/The White House hide caption

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Pete Souza/The White House

Michiko Kakutani (center) stands flanked by Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter and his son Ash at a party in New York City in 2008. Patrick McMullan via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

Michael Bond sits with a Paddington Bear toy in 2008. Bond died Tuesday, according to his publisher, nearly six decades after his beloved character first appeared in print. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

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Sang Tan/AP

The new poet laureate of the United States, Tracy K. Smith, visits the Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center in Washington, D.C., last month. Shawn Miller/Library of Congress hide caption

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Shawn Miller/Library of Congress

Tracy K. Smith Reads 'When Your Small Form Tumbled Into Me'

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Denis Johnson, who won the 2007 National Book Award for Tree of Smoke, died Thursday. Cindy Johnson/ Courtesy of Farrar, Straus & Giroux hide caption

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Cindy Johnson/ Courtesy of Farrar, Straus & Giroux

Former President Bill Clinton gestures to the crowd during a campaign stop in Philadelphia for his wife, Hillary, on the day before the 2016 presidential election. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Author Robert Pirsig and his son Chris in 1968. Pirsig, who wrote Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, died Monday at age 88. William Morrow/HarperCollins hide caption

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William Morrow/HarperCollins

Tavon Tanner tears up before his surgery at Lurie Children's Hospital in October 2016. This photograph is part of the Chicago Tribune series that earned E. Jason Wambsgans the 2017 Pulitzer Prize. E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune/Courtesy of Columbia University hide caption

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E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune/Courtesy of Columbia University

Poet and playwright Derek Walcott published his first poem at the age of 14. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. Brooks Kraft/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Brooks Kraft/Sygma via Getty Images

Derek Walcott, Who Wrote Of Caribbean Beauty And Bondage, Dies At 87

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In 1852 — three years before Leaves of Grass — Walt Whitman anonymously published a short novel, in six parts, in New York's Sunday Dispatch. FPG/Getty Images hide caption

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FPG/Getty Images

Grad Student Discovers A Lost Novel Written By Walt Whitman

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Could this dapper gentleman be Marcel Proust? If it is, as a Canadian professor believes, it would mark the first time the great French author was found in film footage. Le Point/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Le Point/Screenshot by NPR

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