Minneapolis' Tornado, New York City's Violent Winds, Anchorage's Tremors : The Two-Way Both Minneapolis and New York City are cleaning up, the former after a tornado struck south of downtown on Wednesday, the latter after a storm brought hurricane-force winds Tuesday night that toppled scores of trees in Central Park, including gian...

Minneapolis' Tornado, New York City's Violent Winds, Anchorage's Tremors

An uprooted tree lies fallen as a worker sweeps debris from a Central Park Tennis Center court after Tuesday night's violent storm. Bebeto Matthews/AP Photos hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP Photos

An uprooted tree lies fallen as a worker sweeps debris from a Central Park Tennis Center court after Tuesday night's violent storm.

Bebeto Matthews/AP Photos

Nature reminded several American cities of its powerful presence in the last 24 hours.

Both Minneapolis and New York City are cleaning up, the former after a tornado struck south of downtown on Wednesday, the latter after a storm brought hurricane-force winds Tuesday night that toppled scores of trees in Central Park, including giant American elms more than 100 years old.

Meanwhile, Anchorage, Alaska was shaken on Wednesday by a magnitude 5.0 earthquake which apparently jangled some nerves but didn't break anything.

According to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, the Minneapolis tornado destroyed trees and caused some damage to buildings but caused no injuries.

An excerpt:

"This dispels myths that tornadoes don't hit urban areas, they go where they want to," said Pete Boulay, assistant state climatologist. "It doesn't happen very often, but they do happen."

Northbound Interstate 35W at Hwy. 62, already a tangled mess at the southern edge of Minneapolis because of construction, is closed due to flooding.

Central Lutheran Church in downtown had an old copper steeple damaged, and two tents used for entertaining also were struck. One was blown into the street and the other was collapsed, said church spokesman Joe Bjordal. The tents were set up in connection with the national gathering of about 2,000 at the Evangelical Church in America at the Convention Center. "We're thankful that nobody was hurt," Bjordal said.

Representatives on the convention floor could hear rain on the roof, but only became aware of the turbulence outside when unofficial convention-goers were moved in from the outside corridors for their safety.

Meanwhile, according to the New York Times website:

More than 100 trees were toppled and hundreds more were damaged in Central Park during the fierce thunderstorm that moved over New York City on Tuesday night. It was the most severe destruction that the park's trees had sustained in at least 30 years, according to officials at the city's Department of Parks and Recreation and the Central Park Conservancy, which manages the park.

In Alaska, the earthquake's epicenter occurred about 36 miles west of Anchorage at a depth of 38 miles, according to the U.S. Geological Society.

This from the Anchorage Daily News:

Janelle Baker, administrative assistant and human resources manager for the Tyonek Native Corp., told The Associated Press there was no damage in her village of 154 on the northwest shore of Cook Inlet, 43 miles southwest of Anchorage.

"It was scary, especially being in the office," she said. "It was a pretty big jolt."

A dispatcher with the Anchorage Fire Department said the department had not received any calls about the earthquake, but firefighters at one station pulled trucks out of the garage because the building was shaking so much.

It appears most Alaskans took the quake in stride. Alaska State Troopers spokeswoman Megan Peters said there were no immediate calls about the earthquake.

"I was sitting at my computer, and I said, 'Did you guys feel that?' " she told the AP