Do Not Rap Your McDonald's Order In Utah Town : The Two-Way Some Utah teenagers learned a useful lesson: just because you see somebody do something goofy on YouTube doesn't mean you should try it too. Four teens pulled up to a McDonald's drive-through window and one of them, copying a popular YouTube vi...
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Do Not Rap Your McDonald's Order In Utah Town

Some Utah teenagers learned a useful lesson: just because you see somebody do something goofy on YouTube doesn't mean you should try it too.

Four teens pulled up to a McDonald's drive-through window in American Fork, Utah (that's really the name) and one of them, copying a YouTube video that's gotten 6.3 million views, rattled off the food order in the form of rap lyrics, like the life of the average McDonald's employee isn't tough enough.

The employee obviously didn't appreciate the show as much the teens did. The worker got the manager involved. The manager was no fan either. And after the rap was repeated, the manager asked the young men to leave but made sure to write down their car's license plate.

The police were called and found the offending teens at the local high school where an officer wrote them up.

The Salt Lake Tribune interviewed a police sergeant who explained why the teens were given a ticket. A SLT reporter also talked with one of the young men.

An excerpt:

"It was no different from anyone else who is running a business and has someone come in and disrupts that business," he said. "They just continued to keep doing the same thing over and over. After being asked, 'Can you please speak?' they continued to say the same thing over and over."

Spenser Dauwalder, 18, said the group was on their way to a volleyball game when they decided to stop. They performed the brief rap once, with the video playing on an iPod. The worker asked them to repeat themselves, and they rapped the song again more slowly. The worker replied by saying: "Are you going to place your order or are you going to play games?" he said.

... Dauwalder has a scheduled court appearance on Nov. 17, and the family plans to dispute the citation.

"I'm a little stunned by everything. Its hard to believe that kids are getting citations for being silly, I guess," said his mother, Sharon Dauwalder. "I think it's over the top."

No, these days excessive would have been the cop Tasing the kid. A citation for disorderly conduct doesn't sound as bad as their rap likely did.