Judge Smacks Down 'Birther' Orly Taitz For Abusing Court : The Two-Way Federal District Judge Clay D. Land has slapped top birther Orly Taitz with a $20,000 fine for wasting the court's time with her constant filings after he, last month, dismissed her lawsuit against President Obama right as commander-in-chief to de...
NPR logo Judge Smacks Down 'Birther' Orly Taitz For Abusing Court

Judge Smacks Down 'Birther' Orly Taitz For Abusing Court

Federal District Judge Clay D. Land has slapped top birther Orly Taitz with a $20,000 fine for wasting the court's time, among other issues, with her constant filings after he, last month, dismissed her lawsuit against President Obama's right as commander-in-chief to deploy the military because he allegedly isn't legally president.

Because he didn't get rid of her the first time, he's hoping she gets the message this time from the barbed language in the 43-page order he issued Tuesday.

Right off the bat, on page 1 he writes:

For justice to be administered efficiently and justly, lawyers must understand the conditions that goven their privilege to practice law. Lawyers who do not undersyand nthose conditions are at best woefully unprepared to practice the profession and at worst a menace to it...

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... When a lawyer recklessly accuses a judge of violating the Judicial Code of Conduct with no supporting evidence beyond her dissatisfaction with the judge's rulings, that lawyer abuses her privilege to practice law. When a lawyer abuses her privilege to practice law, that lawyer ceases to advance her cause or the ends of justice...

... Regrettably, the conduct of counsel Orly Taitz has crossed these lines, and Ms. Taitz must be sanctioned for her misconduct.

Among Taitz's missteps, she accused the judge of treason. That never works out well.

While it's clear the judge was greatly annoyed by Taitz, it seems like some part of him must have derived satisfaction from smacking her down. The order has real verve to it, with the judge sometimes resorting to biting sarcasm to make many a point that will no doubt be lost on Taitz.

An example from page 27:

Although counsel's present concern is the location of the President's birth, it does not take much imagination to extend the theory to his birthday. Perhaps, he looks "too young" to be President, and he says he stopped counting birthdays when he reached age thirty. If he refused to admit publicly that he is older than the constitutional minimum age of thirty-five, should Ms. Taitz be allowed t file a lawsuit and have a court order him to produce his birth certificate? ... Or perhaps an eccentric citizen has become convinced that the President is an alien from Mars, and the courts should order DNA testing to enforce the Constitution. Or, more to the point, perhaps the Court should issue a nationwide injunction that prevents the U.S. Army from sending any soldier to Iraq or Afghanistan or anywhere else until Ms. Taitz is permitted to depose the President in the Oval Office. The federal courts were not established to resolve such purely political disputes or to assist in the pursuit of a political fishing expedition, particularly when that intrusion would interfere with the ability of the U.S. Army to do its job.

Taitz has 30 days from Tuesday to pay the fine. "If counsel fails to pay the sanction due, the U.S. Attorney will be authorized to commence collection proceedings," the judge writes.

Taitz, a dentist as well as a lawyer, probably won't have trouble raising the cash.