Atheists Going National With Godless Christmas Ads : The Two-Way Atheists don't mind if you accuse them of trying to take the Christ out of Christmas. (American Humanist Association) By Frank James The so-called war on Christmas appears to be escalating this year. The American Humanist Association...
NPR logo Atheists Going National With Godless Christmas Ads

Atheists Going National With Godless Christmas Ads

Atheists don't mind if you accuse them of trying to take the Christ out of Christmas. American Humanist Association hide caption

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American Humanist Association

Atheists don't mind if you accuse them of trying to take the Christ out of Christmas.

American Humanist Association

The so-called war on Christmas appears to be escalating this year.

The American Humanist Association plans to expand nationwide an advertising campaign it began last year in Washington, D.C. calling on all to celebrate a Godless Christmas.

Humanists, whose belief system boils down to you can be good without God, will be running ads with the simple message "No God? No Problem," obviously a controversial slogan in a nation where most people claim religious belief.

From an AHA press release:

"No God?...No Problem!" proclaim the ads, featuring an image of several smiling, Santa hat-clad individuals. The ads will kick off in Washington, D.C. in time for Thanksgiving weekend, running inside 200 buses, fifty rail cars and on the side or tail of twenty buses. The campaign will continue with ads appearing on select buses in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco starting in early December...

... Roy Speckhardt, executive director of the American Humanist Association, explained, "We're hoping this campaign will build awareness about the humanist movement and our ethical life philosophy--particularly among the 'nones:' the rapidly growing percentage of people who claim no religion."

Since 2005, humanist advertising has become increasingly visible, in particular with highway billboards erected in major cities across the United States. And last year, the American Humanist Association sparked national controversy by advertising the slogan "Why Believe in a God? Just be Good for Goodness' Sake," which appeared on Washington, D.C. Metro buses.

This year's holiday campaign aims to promote the idea of being good without God. For example, on D.C. ads that appear on the interior of Metro cars and buses the slogan is accompanied by the explanation, "Be Good for Goodness' Sake. Humanism is the idea that you can be good without a belief in God."