Defunct Gay Newspaper's Staffers To Start Their Own : The Two-Way The staff of the 40-year old Washington Blade, the nation's oldest gay newspaper, which was shuttered by its parent company Monday, plans to put out a new publication for the gay community in the nation's capital.
NPR logo Defunct Gay Newspaper's Staffers To Start Their Own

Defunct Gay Newspaper's Staffers To Start Their Own

Staffers of the defunct Washington Blade plan to publish their own newspaper. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Staffers of the defunct Washington Blade plan to publish their own newspaper.

Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

The staff of the 40-year old Washington Blade, the nation's oldest gay newspaper, which was shuttered by its parent company Sunday, plans to put out a new publication for the gay community in the nation's capital.

Kevin Naff, who was editor of the Blade, disclosed the plan Tuesday in a conversation with NPR's Melissa Block, an All Things Considered host.

MELISSA: What happens to the Blade? Is it going to rise again?

NAFF: The Blade will not but the staff will. We have already met to lay plans for anew publication. I can't announce the name just yet.

MELISSA: Oh, please

NAFF: (Laughs) But we're working on it. Reporters have their assignment. Photographers have their assignment. Salespeople are making calls. And we are very much actively working to launch a new publication with the same staff intact. We met today and we will be putting out a modest publication this Friday.

It might look like that first one on a mimeograph sheet but it will be something as a placeholder. The hope is that the following week, we'd be back to a professional printing press.

Window Media and Unite Media owned the Blade and several other gay newspapers in other cities. Window and Unite were in turn owned by Avalon Equity Fund which ran afoul of an agreement it had with the Small Business Administration which had helped Avalon acquire the newspaper companies. The SBA was appointed by a court as receiver and tried to sell the newspapers but was unsuccessful.

Just as the staff of the Washington Blade is moving in to fill the void, a gay website operator in South Florida Blade said it plans to start a weekly magazine and biweekly newspaper to capture the audience left behind by the South Florida Blade's demise.