In Cuba, Political Oppression Is A Castro Family Affair : The Two-Way In Cuba, it appears the new dictator operates fairly much like the old dictator. The repression of Cuba's political dissidents under Fidel Castro has continued unabated under his brother Raul Castro who has led the communist nation since July 2...
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In Cuba, Political Oppression Is A Castro Family Affair

Under Cuban President Raul Castro, political repression has continued apace. Javier Galeano/AP Photo hide caption

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Javier Galeano/AP Photo

Under Cuban President Raul Castro, political repression has continued apace.

Javier Galeano/AP Photo

In Cuba, it appears the still relatively new dictator operates fairly much like the old dictator.

The repression of Cuba's political dissidents under Fidel Castro has continued unabated under his brother Raul Castro who has led the communist nation since July 2006, according to a new report from Human Rights Watch.

The report's finding isn't a surprise but for the sake of those being held as political prisoners, it's important that HRW continues to shine a light on the situation facing those who have become targets of the Cuban regime for their political views.

An excerpt:

As the new head of state, Raul Castro inherited a system of abusive laws and
institutions, as well as responsibility for hundreds of political prisoners arrested during his
brother's rule. Rather than dismantle this repressive machinery, Raul Castro has kept it
firmly in place and fully active. Scores of political prisoners arrested under Fidel Castro
continue to languish in Cuba's prisons. And Raul Castro's government has used draconian
laws and sham trials to incarcerate scores more who have dared to exercise their
fundamental freedoms.

Raul Castro's government has relied in particular on a provision of the Cuban Criminal Code that allows the state to imprison individuals before they have committed a crime, on the suspicion that they might commit an offense in the future. This "dangerousness" provision is overtly political, defining as "dangerous" any behavior that contradicts socialist norms. The most Orwellian of Cuba's laws, it captures the essence of the Cuban government's
repressive mindset, which views anyone who acts out of step with the government as a
potential threat and thus worthy of punishment.

Despite significant obstacles to research, Human Rights Watch documented more than cases in which Cuba has imprisoned individuals for "dangerousness" under Ra??l Castro
because they tried to exercise their fundamental rights. We believe there are many more. The
"dangerous" activities in these cases have included handing out copies of the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights, staging peaceful marches, writing news articles critical of the
government, and attempting to organize independent unions.

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