If Device On Flight Had Worked, Explosion Could Have Been 'Enormous' : The Two-Way Latest on the alleged attempt to blow up an Amsterdam-to-Detroit flight.
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If Device On Flight Had Worked, Explosion Could Have Been 'Enormous'

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If Device On Flight Had Worked, Explosion Could Have Been 'Enormous'

If Device On Flight Had Worked, Explosion Could Have Been 'Enormous'

"Had the device worked properly, there would have been an enormous explosion," NPR's Dina-Temple Raston said earlier on Morning Edition of the explosive that a Nigerian man is accused of trying to ignite aboard a Northwest flight from Amsterdam as it approached Detroit on Christmas Day.

Here's the conversation Dina had with ME's Steve Inskeep about the latest news regarding the incident. Dina says the explosive is thought to have been PETN. This clip begins with an introduction from ME guest host Linda Wertheimer:

If Device On Flight Had Worked, Explosion Could Have Been 'Enormous'

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Other news about what happened aboard the flight, the suspect and an unnerving incident aboard another jet yesterday:

-- The Associated Press: "Nigerian Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, 23, an Islamic devotee once dubbed 'the Pope' as a sign of respect by classmates, was released from a Michigan hospital in the custody of federal marshals Sunday after being treated for burns. He is charged with attempting to destroy an aircraft and placing a destructive device in a plane. Abdulmutallab's lawyer said Sunday that he is now in a federal prison in Milan, Mich."

-- The New York Times: "Now that Mr. Abdulmutallab is charged with trying to blow up a transcontinental airliner over Detroit on Christmas Day, some members of Congress are urgently questioning why, eight years after the Sept. 11 attacks, security measures still cannot keep makeshift bombs off airliners. On Sunday, as criticism mounted that security lapses had led to a brush with disaster, President Obama ordered a review of the two major planks of the aviation security system -- the creation of watch lists and the use of detection equipment at airport checkpoints."

-- Reuters: "The family of a Nigerian man who tried to blow up a U.S. passenger airliner said on Monday they had lost contact with him while he was studying abroad and reported his disappearance to security agencies two months ago."

-- USA TODAY: "Taking off your shoes is no longer enough. Security agents may pat the soles of your feet, work up your legs to your waist and run a wand across your whole body. Bags may be searched even after they pass the scanner. Bathroom breaks may be eliminated for the last hour of international flights. Blankets on your lap on those flights are verboten, too. Forget about that extra carry-on bag. And those controversial body scanners that can see under passengers' clothes? They could show up at more airports."

-- Detroit Free Press: "Deja Vu On Flight 253." Nigerian passenger who was ill sparked another scare when he spent a long time in the restroom of another Amsterdam-to-Detroit Northwest flight. But he was cleared.