Listen: Voice Claiming To Be Bin Laden Takes Responsiblity For Plane Plot : The Two-Way Osama bin Laden, or someone claiming to be him, is trying to take some of the responsibility for the Christmas Day attempt to blow up a Northwest Airlines passenger jet as it approached Detroit.

Listen: Voice Claiming To Be Bin Laden Takes Responsiblity For Plane Plot

Osama bin Laden, or someone claiming to be him, is trying to take some of the responsibility for the Christmas Day attempt to blow up a Northwest Airlines passenger jet as it approached Detroit.

As the Associated Press writes, an audio recording aired by Al Jazeera today "suggests the al-Qaida leader wants to appear in direct command of the terrorist group's many affiliates around the world at time when some analysts have suggested he is mostly a figurehead."

The voice, saying he is ending a message from "Osama to Obama," says to President Barack Obama that "the message delivered to you through the plane of the heroic warrior Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab was a confirmation of the previous messages sent by the heroes of the Sept. 11. ... America will never dream of security unless we will have it in reality in Palestine."

Abdulmutallab is the young Nigerian man who is accused of trying to ignite explosives hidden in his underwear in a bid to bring the plane down.

It has to be noted, though, that there's no way of knowing yet whether the voice on the recording really is or is not that of bin Laden.

Al Jazeera has put a copy of the recording online. Here's what it sounds like:

On CNN's State of the Union today, White House adviser David Axelrod said that whomever the voice is, the message "contains the same hollow justification for the mass slaughter of innocents."

Meanwhile, the AP also reports that:

For hours after allegedly trying to use a bomb hidden in his underwear to blow up a Christmas Day flight to Detroit, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab talked and talked -- to Customs officers, medical personnel, and FBI agents.

He spoke openly about what he'd done and why, and provided valuable intelligence, U.S. officials told The Associated Press in a series of interviews that spell out for the first time the details of Abdulmutallab's arrest and questioning on Dec. 25.