Afghan Tribal Leader Who Had Worked With U.S. Killed In Suicide Bombing : The Two-Way A man said by U.S. officials to be a "key tribal leader" in Afghanistan who had in the past been an ally of the U.S. was killed today by a suicide bomber in an attack that left at least 15 people dead.
NPR logo Afghan Tribal Leader Who Had Worked With U.S. Killed In Suicide Bombing

Afghan Tribal Leader Who Had Worked With U.S. Killed In Suicide Bombing

A man said by U.S. officials to be a "key tribal leader" in Afghanistan who had in the past been an ally of the U.S. was killed today by a suicide bomber in an attack that left at least 15 people dead, the Associated Press reports.

Mohammad Zaman had led Afghan militia at the battle of Tora Bora in late 2001 and 2002 -- when al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden apparently escaped to Pakistan. The attack that killed him and the others happened in eastern Afghanistan's Nangarhar province. That isn't near the scene of fighting in the south, where U.S., NATO and Afghan forces are trying to push Taliban forces out of the crossroads community of Marjah.

Also in the news from Afghanistan, as we reported earlier: A NATO airstrike in the central part of the country on Sunday killed at least 27 civilians. From Kabul, NPR's Corey Flintoff reports that:

"NATO officials issued a statement saying its pilots believed they were attacking a convoy of insurgent fighters, but when ground forces reached the scene, they found that the dead included women and children. The Afghan cabinet condemned the attack, calling it 'unjustifiable.' "

The Two-Way

The Two-Way

Breaking News From NPR

About