Immigration Reform Should Be 'Practical' And Value-Driven, Survey Signals : The Two-Way At an immigration reform rally Sunday in Washington. (Jacquelyn Martin/AP) By Mark Memmott A "comprehensive approach to immigration reform" -- one of the next big issues facing lawmakers in Washington --"finds broad support across reli...

Immigration Reform Should Be 'Practical' And Value-Driven, Survey Signals

At an immigration reform rally Sunday in Washington. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

At an immigration reform rally Sunday in Washington.

Jacquelyn Martin/AP

A "comprehensive approach to immigration reform" -- one of the next big issues facing lawmakers in Washington --"finds broad support across religious groups," according to surveys of voters done for the Public Religion Research Institute.

Among the findings:

-- "Nearly 9-in10 (86%) American voters favor (6-in-10 strongly favor) a policy that includes one of the key provisions of comprehensive immigration reform -- that illegal immigrants be required to register with the government, work, pay taxes, and learn English before having the opportunity to apply for citizenship."

-- "When the description of comprehensive reform includes language emphasizing that it reflects a commitment to the dignity of every person -- by giving everyone 'an opportunity to be responsible, contribute their fair share, and become full members of society' -- fully two-thirds (66%) of voters choose that option, resulting in a 38-point margin over those embracing the opposing position (28%)."

-- Support for "comprehensive" reform that focuses on an "earned path to citizenship ... remains strong across all religious traditions."

-- "American voters want practical solutions to fix what they perceive to be a broken immigration system, but they also believe immigration reform should be guided by a number of key values. Four values are rated very or extremely important by at least 8-in-10 voters: enforcing the rule of law and promoting national security (88%), ensuring fairness to taxpayers (84%), protecting the dignity of every person (82%), and keeping families together (80%)."

The institute says it "specializes in providing research-based strategic advice at the intersection of religion, values, and public policy."

The survey of 2,005 registered voters was conducted from March 5 to 11. Of the total, 402 voters were in Ohio, 402 were in Arkansas and the remaining 1,201 were from across the nation. The institute says margins of error on the results range from +/- 3 percentage points to +/- 5.5 percentage points.

(H/T to NPR's Liz Halloran.)