Nashville Institutions Taking On Water : The Two-Way Though the rain has stopped, the Cumberland River that runs past Nashville has yet to crest according to reports. Thus, some of Nashville's most important tourist destinations are taking on water as many parts of the city and surrounding regions a...

Nashville Institutions Taking On Water

Flooding in downtown Nashville. Kristin M. Hall/AP Photo hide caption

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Kristin M. Hall/AP Photo

Though the rain has stopped, the Cumberland River that runs past Nashville has yet to crest according to reports.

Thus, some of Nashville's most important tourist destinations are taking on water as many parts of the city and surrounding regions attempt to deal with flooding.

The Tennessean reports that the Opryland Hotel and the Country Music Hall of Fame are only two frequently visited locations in the city with water in them.

An excerpt:

The Opryland Hotel, the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Schermerhorn Symphony center are among the Nashville institutions experiencing damage from devastating weekend rainfall that continues to wreak havoc across the area. And, the Cumberland River is still rising.

Country Music Hall of Fame has five feet of water in mechanical room

The Country Music Hall of Fame is closed today with five feet of water in one low-level mechanical room. That flooding has seeped into the loading area for the subterranean Ford Theater.

None of the exhibit halls are in danger of floodwater, spokeswoman Liz Thiels said.

Officials are still evaluating whether to open on Tuesday, she said.

Flooding from the weekend's massive rains has left at least 12 people dead in Tennessee alone.

National Weather Service data indicate that the Cumberland River as of 2:30 pm Nashville time was more than 11 feet over flood stage:

National Weather Service chart shows the Cumberland River at least 11 feet over flood stage. NWS hide caption

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NWS

National Weather Service chart shows the Cumberland River at least 11 feet over flood stage.

NWS

The chart indicates that the river is expected to crest sometime in the next 24 hours.

WPLN-FM at 90.9 FM, NPR's member station in Nashville, was knocked off the air by falling trees that took out the power lines to the station's transmitter. The station is streaming its signal over the Internet, however.

WPLN.org has a small report on the general situation in Nashville.