To Settle Paternity Claim, Iceland Will Exhume Bobby Fischer's Remains : The Two-Way The Supreme Court of Iceland gave the go-ahead, to obtain enough genetic material from Fischer's remains to assess the validity of a paternity claim brought by a nine-year-old girl.
NPR logo To Settle Paternity Claim, Iceland Will Exhume Bobby Fischer's Remains

To Settle Paternity Claim, Iceland Will Exhume Bobby Fischer's Remains

Chess legend Bobby Fischer, at New Tokyo International Airport, in 2005, three years before he died. Junko Kimura/Getty Images AsiaPac hide caption

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Junko Kimura/Getty Images AsiaPac

In 2008, when Bobby Fischer died, he left no will.

Since then, the one-time international chess champion's estate -- valued at some $2 million, according to the BBC -- has been fought over, the subject of several lawsuits.

Jinky Young, a nine-year-old Filipino girl, says Fischer is her biological father.  In fact, her mother, Marilyn Young, and Fischer were in a relationship together.

To determine if her paternity claim is legitimate, Icelandic officials plan to disinter Fischer's remains, to obtain a tissue sample.

The Supreme Court of Iceland gave permission for the exhumation yesterday.

"The verdict overturned a ruling by a district court, which said earlier this year that the grounds of the request were not strong enough," the BBC reports.

According to The New York Times, "other claims have been filed on the estate by Miyoko Watai, a Japanese chess official, who said she is Mr. Fischer's wife, two nephews of Mr. Fischer's and the United States, which says he owes back taxes."

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