Deadly Week Starts For U.S., NATO In Afghanistan : The Two-Way It's only Tuesday and already the week is proving especially deadly for U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan.
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Deadly Week Starts For U.S., NATO In Afghanistan

Dand District region governor Naziak (bottom, in vest) addresses through a translator American soldiers in the 1-71st Cavalry of the 10th Mountain Division after a memorial for slain comrade Lt. Joseph Theinert June 8, 2010 at their patrol base in Belanday, south of Kandahar, Afghanistan. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Dand District region governor Naziak (bottom, in vest) addresses through a translator American soldiers in the 1-71st Cavalry of the 10th Mountain Division after a memorial for slain comrade Lt. Joseph Theinert June 8, 2010 at their patrol base in Belanday, south of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Chris Hondros/Getty Images

It's only Tuesday and already the week is proving especially deadly for U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan.

Monday was the deadliest day in Afghanistan this year for members of foreign militaries trying to stabilize Afghanistan. The U.S. lost seven troops, five in a single road side bombing in eastern Afghanistan and two more in separate attacks. Ten NATO troops all told were lost Monday.

On Tuesday, two more U.S. servicemembers were killed in a bombing in southern Afghanistan. A third NATO member was also reported killed by small arms fire though no nationality was immediately provided, according to an Associated Press report.

AP also reports that the death toll for NATO forces is 24 in just over a week.

In addition to the nine reported U.S. military deaths Monday and Tuesday, two Australians and a member of the French Foreign Legion were killed Monday.

NATO casualties were expected to rise this year as troop levels increased as part of President Barack Obama's Afghanistan surge meant to thwart Taliban efforts to exert control in vast regions of the country.

The surge is partly meant to allow NATO to mount an offensive against Kandahar in Afghanistan's south, the Taliban's stronghold. Thus, the fighting is expected to be fierce with the associated rise in casualties among NATO forces.