From The NPR Vault: Dissing The Not-So Dead : The Two-Way P.J. O'Rourke makes the case for "pre-obituaries" to tell folks what we really think of them.
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From The NPR Vault: Dissing The Not-So Dead

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From The NPR Vault: Dissing The Not-So Dead

From The NPR Vault: Dissing The Not-So Dead

Writer P.J. O'Rourke has a novel idea to shore up the sagging newspaper industry. Don't wait until people pass away to tell them how we feel: do it now, so you can highlight the bad with the good. The notorious Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me panelist highlights the worst of his favorite liberal targets, living and dead with the use of the Pre-Obituary. Fair warning: He has some not-so-nice things to say about folks such as Ted Kennedy. (Hat Tip to the Daily Dish and Andrew Sullivan.)

I wondered if others felt like P.J. So, with the help of NPR librarian Elizabeth Allin, I searched the NPR vault for this item by commentator Daniel Pinkwater from October 9, 1992. Pinkwater muses about singer Sinead O'Connor's controversial appearance on Saturday Night Live a few days earlier, in which she tore a picture of the then-pope, John Paul II to express her displeasure with the pontiff. Her action drew instant condemnation, but Pinkwater thought he could help the singer by dissing some people on his own. He took aim at a few favorites of conservatives and liberals:

From The NPR Vault: Dissing The Not-So Dead

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