Ex-FEMA Head Michael "Heck Of A Job" Brown, AKA 'Brownie,' Returns To Gulf : The Two-Way The infamous former director of FEMA, Michael Brown, has returned to New Orleans, to broadcast his Denver-based radio show from there.

Ex-FEMA Head Michael "Heck Of A Job" Brown, AKA 'Brownie,' Returns To Gulf

"Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job..."

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Former Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Director Michael Brown testifies during a hearing before the House Select Hurricane Katrina Committee in 2005. Win McNamee/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images North America

When President George W. Bush traveled to the Gulf Coast, days after Hurricane Katrina made landfall there, he thanked Michael D. Brown, the director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for his hard work:

"Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job..."

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Those words became infamous.

Brown has returned to New Orleans this week, to anchor his Denver-based radio show from there. Harry Shearer, whom NPR's Neal Conan interviewed earlier this week, was among his guests. He is also featured in Spike Lee's newest joint, If God Is Willing And Da Creek Don't Rise.

In an interview with The Washington Post, Brown said that, in the wake of the disaster, he was a scapegoat for the Bush administration, which didn't provide him with any of the resources he asked for, or the support he needed.

Reporter Campbell Robertson says "the topic of Katrina was addressed, but did not dominate the show on Wednesday night."

For a few minutes, Mr. Brown discussed a newspaper article about the behavior of the police after the storm, opined on the events of those days and the subsequent lagging recovery, then suggested an America that had lost its mojo, to use his phrasing.