In Interview, Assange Hints At Unreleased Documents In WikiLeaks' Possession : The Two-Way The WikiLeaks founder also talked about the man being held in military detention for allegedly leaking classified documents.
NPR logo In Interview, Assange Hints At Unreleased Documents In WikiLeaks' Possession

In Interview, Assange Hints At Unreleased Documents In WikiLeaks' Possession

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in south-east London. Leon Neal /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal /AFP/Getty Images

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrives at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in south-east London.

Leon Neal /AFP/Getty Images

In a interview with British magazine New Statesman, Julian Assange is hinting at what's ahead for WikiLeaks. Assange, the founder of the site that's leaked tons of sensitive government documents, said that if anything happened to him, he's prepared to release documents that belong to Rupert Murdoch and his media company News Corp, as well as "504 U.S. embassy cables on one broadcasting organisation."

Perhaps a more interesting revelation is what he said about Bradley Manning, who the military has accused of unlawfully accessing and leaking classified information:

"I'd never heard his name before it was published in the press," [Assange said]. He argues that the US is trying to use Manning - currently stuck in solitary confinement in the US - to build a case against the WikiLeaks founder:

"Cracking Bradley Manning is the first step," says the Australian hacker. "The aim clearly is to break him and force a confession that he somehow conspired with me to harm the national security of the United States."

Such conspiracy would be impossible, according to Assange. "WikiLeaks technology was designed from the very beginning to make sure that we never knew the identities or names of people subĀ¬mitting material. We are as untraceable as we are uncensorable. That's the only way to assure sources they are protected."

In prior public statements, Assange said he had documents that belonged to a major American banking institution. WikiLeaks also ran into a bit of controversy in December when The Washington Post reported that it had not made good on its promise to contribute to Manning's legal fund.

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