Bloods, Crips ... And Juggalos? Insane Clown Posse Fans Called A Gang : The Two-Way Federal authorities say some fans of the rap group are exhibiting "gang-like behavior." Those who've gotten to know the Juggalos say they're mostly "misunderstood outsiders."
NPR logo Bloods, Crips ... And Juggalos? Insane Clown Posse Fans Called A Gang

Bloods, Crips ... And Juggalos? Insane Clown Posse Fans Called A Gang

Reading through the latest National Gang Threat Assessment from the Justice Department's National Gang Intelligence Center, Wired's Spencer Ackerman came to a section that surprised him.

From the federal report. National Gang Intelligence Center hide caption

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National Gang Intelligence Center

From the federal report.

National Gang Intelligence Center

It seems that along with the Crips, Bloods, MS-13 and other gangs causing problems across the nation, there's also the Juggalos.

Who?

They would be, "fans of the shticky rap group Insane Clown Posse," as Ackerman says.

Or, as the center's report says rather dryly in a footnote: "traditionally fans of the musical group the Insane Clown Posse."

According to the center, Juggalos are a "loosely-organized hybrid gang [that is] rapidly expanding into many U.S. communities."

And, "although recognized as a gang in only four states, many Juggalos subsets exhibit gang-like behavior and engage in criminal activity and violence. Law enforcement officials in at least 21 states have identified criminal Juggalo sub-sets, according to NGIC reporting."

What have they reportedly done?

"Crimes committed by Juggalos are sporadic, disorganized, individualistic, and often involve simple assault, personal drug use and possession, petty theft, and vandalism. However, open source reporting suggests that a small number of Juggalos are forming more organized subsets and engaging in more gang-like criminal activity, such as felony assaults, thefts, robberies, and drug sales. Social networking websites are a popular conveyance for Juggalo sub-culture to communicate and expand."

That analysis doesn't quite line up with some of Wired's other reporting about ICP and the Juggalos.

Last year, the magazine looked at how ICP has built a large following and wrote about the group's "pop-culture sleeper cell of fans, who call themselves the Juggalos (so named for a 1992 ICP song, The Juggla)." And it reported that:

"Despite a sizable population of female fans (dubbed Juggalettes), ICP's following is made up mostly of young white men from working-class backgrounds. They tend to feel that they've been misunderstood outsiders their whole lives, whether for being overweight, looking weird, being poor, or even for just liking ICP in the first place. It's a world where man boobs are on proud display, where long-hairs and pink-hairs mingle, where nobody makes fun of the fat kid toweling off."